#1
Sorry, I'm a bit of a noob to the forum and don't know if my thread's in the right place but here goes...

I've found myself in a real state with guitar. I've kind of lost the burning desire that I once had and my practicing has come to a grinding halt. I never had a really clear set practice routine I just learned what I wanted to learn. I've read a lot on the internet and I now reckon it could be because I wasn't really monitoring my progress. I've sort of resolved and decided that to get happy with it again I should take a real challenge: I've decided to try and learn the Beast and the Harlott all the way through. This'll probably take a few months of extreme self discipline, but I figured if I can reach that level, I'll have proved to myself that anything is possible.

I was just wondering if you guys think this sounds like a good idea, or whether I should try something else. I've also decided that now I've got to the level where a practice routine that's organized and efficient is needed. But I don't really know where to start with that. Any advice on anyone's practice routines would help. Just tell me what you do. E.g. Write in a practice log etc. Anyone ever experienced similar burned-outedness? I basically just need to hear anything, no matter how small, from fellow musicians.

Sorry to be so vague...
#3
Make up a practice routine. For example:

Finger excercises 10 min
Scales 10 Min
Arpeggios 10 min

and so on...then stick with it. You don't need to take all the 30 minutes in one section. Spread them around for the day, and as time goes on you might find 10 minutes too short of time and you raise it to 15, then 20 etc.

Just make sure you learn something in the long term. For me at least longterm-practice seems most efficient, because you can do 10 minutes everyday and feel like you're getting somewhere. Do scales for 10 minutes everyday for one week and you'll notice that you're remembering them easier, etc. If you want to learn to read standard notation this is a great way, it might seem like very hard work, but 10 minutes everyday is quite enough, just stick to that routine.
#4
Quote by Jazz Bee
Sorry, I'm a bit of a noob to the forum and don't know if my thread's in the right place but here goes...

I've found myself in a real state with guitar. I've kind of lost the burning desire that I once had and my practicing has come to a grinding halt. I never had a really clear set practice routine I just learned what I wanted to learn. I've read a lot on the internet and I now reckon it could be because I wasn't really monitoring my progress. I've sort of resolved and decided that to get happy with it again I should take a real challenge: I've decided to try and learn the Beast and the Harlott all the way through. This'll probably take a few months of extreme self discipline, but I figured if I can reach that level, I'll have proved to myself that anything is possible.

I was just wondering if you guys think this sounds like a good idea, or whether I should try something else. I've also decided that now I've got to the level where a practice routine that's organized and efficient is needed. But I don't really know where to start with that. Any advice on anyone's practice routines would help. Just tell me what you do. E.g. Write in a practice log etc. Anyone ever experienced similar burned-outedness? I basically just need to hear anything, no matter how small, from fellow musicians.

Sorry to be so vague...


Personally, I think you're just setting yourself up for failure with artificial time limits.
A practice schedule really only works to LIMIT the time you spend on any one thing --
not to force yourself to practice.

You just "learned what you wanted to learn"... That's what most people do at first.
There's some initial progress, but then a few years in, it stops.

Most likely what will happen is this: either you'll "re-invent" yourself with respect to
practicing and playing the guitar, or you'll eventually lose interest due to lack of much
progress. Sorry to say, I think most people wind up in the latter category.

The first thing you might want to think about is why you're losing burning desire. If you
can honestly answer that question, you can begin to move in the direction where you'll
find progress, and you don't need artificial time limits or "challenges" to do that.
#5
yes I have indeed. I found out that concentrating on something else (I started learning the drums) for a while did wonders for me. Try expanding your musical horizons (try new genres for example) Within 2 weeks I was back feeling rejuvenated!
Quote by futurejimmypage
HOLEY MOLEY MACCARONI!!!! you are like 7 hours into the future. Whats it like? is the war over? is bush dead? Are the new episodes of family guy out yet? is global warming over? Did they unfreeze walt Disney???