#1
OK, I've never had a really nice acoustic and I'm considering buying one, before I do I'd appreciate it if I could get answers to the following questions:

1. What tonal differences are there between using solid rosewood or solid mahogany for the back or sides? The model I'm looking at has the 2 options, the rosewood being 200 pounds more expensive.

2. Is a guitar humidifier a good investment? If so are there any you'd recommend?

3. Beyond standard restringing, polishing and fretboard maintenance are there any other maintenance things I should keep in mind to make sure it's in perfect condition?

4. Are there any useful products that make keeping an acoustic in top condition any easier?

5. How hard should I push end pins in when restringing an acoustic? I currently own a Fender Telecoustic and whenever I restring it I have to push them in rather forcefully to make sure they don't pop out when I tighten the strings, however as a result of this I have damaged the ends when using pliers to try and pull them out again.

Thanks.
#2
About using pliers, you should invest in a Dunlop Peg winder/ Bridge pin pusher/puller. That way you won't damage the end of your bridge pins, or the bridge. They're under five usd.
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#3
As for #5, one of the first things I learned to do on my acoustic was how to restring it myself. You don't need to push them in forcefully. And you *don't* use pliers to take it out. The strings have a small ball on the end that helps keep them in place, and to pull the pins out, you just have to press the string into the hole some, sometimes jiggle it a little and the pin will loosen up quite easily. If that *really* isn't working at all, there is a small cutout on string winders that you fit to help get it out. It takes a little practice to get the pins to stay. It must have been a nice 10 minutes to get my first two pins to stay right, after that, the other 4 pins were done in a matter of seconds. When you use pliers and pry out the pins, you can damage and scrape out the inside of the hole and it makes it harder for the pins and strings to stay right. its like ripping out a screw that's in wood, you grind on the hole.
Guitars Owned: Yamaha F335
#4
Quote by blynd_snyper
OK, I've never had a really nice acoustic and I'm considering buying one, before I do I'd appreciate it if I could get answers to the following questions:

1. What tonal differences are there between using solid rosewood or solid mahogany for the back or sides? The model I'm looking at has the 2 options, the rosewood being 200 pounds more expensive.

2. Is a guitar humidifier a good investment? If so are there any you'd recommend?

3. Beyond standard restringing, polishing and fretboard maintenance are there any other maintenance things I should keep in mind to make sure it's in perfect condition?

4. Are there any useful products that make keeping an acoustic in top condition any easier?

5. How hard should I push end pins in when restringing an acoustic? I currently own a Fender Telecoustic and whenever I restring it I have to push them in rather forcefully to make sure they don't pop out when I tighten the strings, however as a result of this I have damaged the ends when using pliers to try and pull them out again.

Thanks.


1. Rosewood is a generally more bassy wood than Mahogany. However, this all depends on the shape, size, and bracing of each guitar. A Mahogany dreadnought may be much bassier than a rosewood concert size/shaped guitar. Rosewood is just more expensive because it's harder to come by. Although nowadays, mahogany is getting more expensive because it is starting to get scarce. Neither is better than the other.

2.You need a humidifier if your climate gets dry. This happens to me during the winter time. If you need one, Oasis makes a pretty good case humidifier. You just fill it up with distilled water(always use distilled water) and then leave it in your case with your guitar.

3. Heck, you don't even need to polish your guitar. Just wipe it down with a damp cloth(if you have gloss). The fretboard just needs a good moisturizing every half a year or so.

4. Not in particular. GHS Fast Fret and Fingerease are pretty good products though. Search google if you want to see any specifics.

5. You shouldn't need to push hard at all. The tension of the ball against the bridge plate should be enough to keep it in place when the strings are tuned up to full tension. When you take strings off, just push the strings into the guitar and then pull on the pins with your fingers.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

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#5
Quote by captivate
1. Rosewood is a generally more bassy wood than Mahogany. However, this all depends on the shape, size, and bracing of each guitar. A Mahogany dreadnought may be much bassier than a rosewood concert size/shaped guitar. Rosewood is just more expensive because it's harder to come by. Although nowadays, mahogany is getting more expensive because it is starting to get scarce. Neither is better than the other.

If the two guitars were both dreadnoughts, and were identical aside from the wood used for back and sides how would the highs and mids compare? Would the additional bass of the rosewood sacrifice some of the treble tone?
#6
Quote by blynd_snyper
If the two guitars were both dreadnoughts, and were identical aside from the wood used for back and sides how would the highs and mids compare? Would the additional bass of the rosewood sacrifice some of the treble tone?


Not necessarily. Rosewood often pronounces the high and lows but can lack in the middle. To my ear, mahogany often works best with mid tones. However, if you get a nice piece of either on your guitar, you wont find many faults. It's all about making sure the particular instrument sounds good to you.

2.) I would say a humidifier is only necessary if you live in a particularly dry climate. In Connecticut, I never need to humidify any of my guitars. I actually like it if they dry out a bit in the winter. They get a bit more "pop" when played.

3.) The most important maintenance you can do is to keep playing your guitar. Long periods without use can wreak havoc on your overall setup.

4.) I hear forearm sweat does wonders for improving your tone. I only occasionally wipe down the guitar top with some breath and a shirt.

5. In a decent acoustic should should never need to actually push the pins in. The important thing is to make sure the ball end is clamped in the right spot. Other than that, just enough pressure to keep it from slipping out when you first tune up.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Oct 26, 2008,