#1
Okay so i am not sure how steps work..eg a perfect fifth from E is B i get that but that about Eb? Are the steps depending on the key?
#3
A step is 2 semi-tones up. A fifth is the 5th interval of the major scale

a major scale is:

Base, step, step, half step, step, step, step, half step.
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#4
A true interval is "keyless", in that it is merely a measure of the distance between 2 notes. Yes, each key has distinct intervals that represent the distances between the notes of that key, and they do matter. However, they are more aptly referred to as scale degrees.

Again, an interval is just a measure of distance from where you start, to where you stop. In your particular example, in the key of E Major, the Perfect Fifth is B. In any other context than the key of E Major, that same distance would just be a Fifth and would generally not be referred to as 'Perfect'. In the key of Eb Major it's Bb.

If we were still in the key of E Major, Bb would be a diminished Fifth.
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#5
Quote by Hammer Pull
A true interval is "keyless", in that it is merely a measure of the distance between 2 notes. Yes, each key has distinct intervals that represent the distances between the notes of that key, and they do matter. However, they are more aptly referred to as scale degrees.

Again, an interval is just a measure of distance from where you start, to where you stop. In your particular example, in the key of E Major, the Perfect Fifth is B. In any other context than the key of E Major, that same distance would just be a Fifth and would generally not be referred to as 'Perfect'. In the key of Eb Major it's Bb.

If we were still in the key of E Major, Bb would be a diminished Fifth.



okay the basic thing im confused about when looking at a piano is whether the intervals go up in semitones/half steps


eg E to B is a perfect fifth, and thats counting through

e f g a b

not counting f g and a sharp?


Eb to Bb is a perfect fifth and thats counting through

eb f g a a sharp?


?!?
#6
Quote by Tw8xy
eg E to B is a perfect fifth, and thats counting through

e f g a b

not counting f g and a sharp?


Eb to Bb is a perfect fifth and thats counting through

eb f g a a sharp?


?!?

From E to B:

E F F# G G# A A# B

B is seven semitones away from E. That makes it a Perfect Fifth.

Eb to Bb:

Eb F Gb G Ab A Bb B

Same thang. Seven semitones, Perfect Fifth.

Remember that an interval is the amount of semitones between two notes.
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#7
This may help you a lot

Half Steps
0 Unison (Perfect)
1 m2 (minor)
2 M2 (Major)
3 m3
4 M3
5 P4 (Perfect)
6 A4, D5 (Augmented or Diminished)
7 P5
8 m6
9 M6
10 m7
11 M7
12 Octave (Perfect)

Augmented and Diminished are something you should study after you really really understand the ones above but I'll briefly describe them.

Augmented, taking a Major or Perfect interval and raising it another half step.
Diminished, taking a minor or Perfect interval and lowering it a half step.
eg:

C to Abb = d6 (double flat, same as G, but written in scores differently)
C to Ab = m6
C to A = M6
C to A# = A6

Semitones = half steps
Count the half steps, memorize the chart and get practicing.

musictheory.net trainers are great for this stuff!
Hope that helps, any more questions just PM or post again
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