#1
Hello,

I have been practicing guitar for a few months now. I am being self taught by using Hal Leonard's Guitar Method Book 1 & Book 2.

I have a question that is simple to answer, at least for someone smarter than me.

I have learned some basic chords such a G, G7, C, Em, Am, D, etc. My short term goal is to be able to play in our church band for worship service. The piano is our lead instrument so I would just be playing chords. With that being said, I am confused as to when I am supposed to actually strum the chords?

My girlfriend plays the piano and she says when she plays chords on the piano you just kind of play whenever?

Any valuable input?
#2
Quote by uhcord98


I have learned some basic chords such a G, G7, C, Em, Am, D, etc.


Well have you learned C add9, A, Dm, F, or any power chords? They are some must know chords to play any where
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#3
You can either strum the chords, or "pick" the notes of the chord. This means that you just randomly play the strings one by one on the chord that you are playing.

You strum or pick however you want to in the song. Its up to you.

I hope that helped. Let me know if you have any more questions.
#4
Quote by ZeppelinRulez77
You can either strum the chords, or "pick" the notes of the chord. This means that you just randomly play the strings one by one on the chord that you are playing.

You strum or pick however you want to in the song. Its up to you.

I hope that helped. Let me know if you have any more questions.


Yes, I guess I just had trouble with the concept of strumming the chords whenever I want since I learned the notes first and you have to read these to play. I felt like there should be something that I am reading and following along with.

When you are playing chords and strumming whenever you want how do you know when to switch to the other chords?
#5
My advice: get a friend or someone else you know to show you some standard strumming rhythms. It works a lot better than having someone explain them to you (videos also work).

Also, depending on the song, instead of strumming, you can arpeggiate the chords (play the chord note by note up or down the strings). If you feel like fingerpicking, you can get even fancier with arpeggiations (you can with a pick too, but it's much easier to do it with fingers).

EDIT:
Quote by uhcord98
When you are playing chords and strumming whenever you want how do you know when to switch to the other chords?

It depends on what you're reading the music off of:
1.) A sheet with the chords changes written above the lyrics (simple rhythm sheet)
2.) Sheet music: it may or may not have the chords written above the staff. If it does, use that. If if doesn't, get different sheet music
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Last edited by Athetosis at Oct 26, 2008,
#6
Usually, if the chords are written above the music,

Am
_______________________
|______________|_________
|______________|_________
|______________|________
|______________|________


G
_______________________
|______________|_________
|______________|_________
|______________|________
|______________|________

like so with no direction of rythum,

then if there is say 4 quarters notes in bar 2, then you strum Am four times (in keeping with the rythum), and two quarter notes and a half note in bar 3 then strum G accordingly.

Also i've seen where Am is played just once for the entire length of the bar, letting the chord ring out.
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Last edited by baylewis at Oct 27, 2008,
#7
You just need to practice both chord strumming and picking. You need to get good at both.