#1
Another pesky chord I had some trouble naming, purely looking at these from the interval side of things.


E--x--
B--0--
G--2--
D--1--
A--3--
E--x--


I was looking at this and taking what some people said in my last one (about the half diminished chord), that the 7th has more importance when it comes to naming a chord than I previously thought.

Taking that into consideration I named the chord above as CmM7add6(no 5) or Cm/maj7add6(no 5), whichever notation people prefer. My question is am I right to assume that the 7th is more important than the 6th (when they are both used in the same chord)? This is a question sticking in my head for about a week now and I can't find a good answer anywhere (don't know anyone good at theory in person)

Thanks
#2
B7b9 or your chord, I'd probably notate it as "add 13".
Last edited by mdc at Oct 27, 2008,
#3
well, the Cm/maj7add6 is a good call, and a lot of times you don't really need a 5th on the chord as long as you have the tonic and third (and seventh if you wanna get a 7 chord) due to the overtone series, I would name it an Adim/add2 chord since you have the A C Eb and B going on, granted, it's in first inversion since you have the C as your bass note, but that's all I can think of right now,

you could also just make that B into a C and open the A on the fifth string and make it a plain A dim chord in first inversion with a doubled root and avoid all the naming trouble, hope this helps
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Last edited by Jastul at Oct 27, 2008,
#4
Thanks for the replies guys, would you say that the 7th is one of the more important intervals (more so than the 6th). The reason I asked is that I immediately called this chord a Cm6add7 (which I note is completely wrong), but it's just obvious to me that the 6th and 7th are fighting in my head a bit. If someone could name a winner it would help, do you take note of 7th or 6th first when naming a chord?
#5
I don't quite understand the compulsion to write unnecessarily specific chord names. If you have a voicing you want, spell it out on a staff. Otherwise, indicating function is fine.

I's a tonic chord from C melodic minor: I'd note it as a CmM7 or CmM13.
#6
Main reason is half the time I can't be bothered to draw out a staff, I would love to get to the stage where I can write down a specific chord name and then know what it is, that'll be the day though.
#7
Quote by Helpy Helperton
Thanks for the replies guys, would you say that the 7th is one of the more important intervals (more so than the 6th). The reason I asked is that I immediately called this chord a Cm6add7 (which I note is completely wrong), but it's just obvious to me that the 6th and 7th are fighting in my head a bit. If someone could name a winner it would help, do you take note of 7th or 6th first when naming a chord?

When you build a chord, you build it by stacking 3rds yep?

Now lets take a chord like Cm6. This is built by stacking 3rds to the 5th degree, then adding the 6 on top.

Any chord that's built beyond the 7th degree is known as an extended chord. So Cm13 would have stacked 3rds to the 7th degree (which is the last "stacked 3rd" before returning to the octave), then adding the 6 (13) on top.

Strictly speaking that should be called "add 13" as there are no extensions in between the 7 and 6(13), like a 9 or an 11.

I wanna type more, but haven't got time. Does this make sense?

Edit: Here's some more examples.

Cm9: R b3 5 b7 9
Cm11: R b3 5 b7 9 11
Cm13: R b3 5 b7 9 11 13

Bear in mind that with these extended chords, you can afford to drop a few notes (obviously not the one that's named in the chord!), but keep the 3 and 7 degrees as they define the chord's tonality.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 27, 2008,