#2
just take some power chords from the scale and play around.
also it might be a good idea to try and match the notes of the lead line with the power chords.
like if the lead line goes: A C E B
have the power chords go: A A E E

basic harmony


EDIT: see what i mean?
if you dont know theory, just use your ears, and what sounds good to YOU is all that matters.
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Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Oct 27, 2008,
#4
umm if you mean which power chords will be in key with the scale then all power chords where the notes in them are in the scale you are using will work.

i think in a major scale for example you will be able to use all the power chords with roots that are in that major scale (so for C major, u can use a C power chord, D power chord etc) EXCEPT for the power chord whose root is the last note in that scale, since the 5th of that power chord is out of key.

i think...
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#5
Quote by Masry
umm if you mean which power chords will be in key with the scale then all power chords where the notes in them are in the scale you are using will work.

i think in a major scale for example you will be able to use all the power chords with roots that are in that major scale (so for C major, u can use a C power chord, D power chord etc) EXCEPT for the power chord whose root is the last note in that scale, since the 5th of that power chord is out of key.

i think...


Yea, you're correct Masry.

Because..a B power chord (or B5) would have a B and an F#. And F# is not in the key of C major. And just for an explanation of why the B5 is like that, it is because if it is normally in key, it would be a diminished chord (a flatted third and fifth). Then, in turn, the F# would become an F which is in the key of C major.

Sorry if I confused you more.
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Last edited by hothead69999 at Oct 27, 2008,
#6
Quote by a7xrocks02
wow... i love how 5 hours later noone answers my question


Maybe because it's covered in the theory sticky and countless other articles on this website.
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#7
As a bit of a tip; 'dumb down' your chords behind your solo, makes it easier for the soloist to make one up....this is especially true while improvving. If you notice even the likes of decapitated and CoB usually take a furiously fast verse riff and simplify it a hell of a lot for the playing behind the solo.
#8
Quote by a7xrocks02
i dont get this....if i write a lead line (off a scale, of course)...how do i know what power chords will sound good behind it?

You're kind of doing it backwards, it's far easier to take a chord progression first and then write a lead line over it.
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#9
Quote by steven seagull
You're kind of doing it backwards, it's far easier to take a chord progression first and then write a lead line over it.
Considering that's how you do it theoretically, +1


If you're really going to shove some lead into a song and be forced to write the rhythm under it, raping the parts of the song before and after it then I say Oh, and get over waiting 3 1/2 hours. That's not long considering people have lives and they only volunteer to answer questions, they're not required.
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#10
Quote by philbertfwog
As a bit of a tip; 'dumb down' your chords behind your solo, makes it easier for the soloist to make one up....this is especially true while improvving. If you notice even the likes of decapitated and CoB usually take a furiously fast verse riff and simplify it a hell of a lot for the playing behind the solo.

thats actually a really good idea
if you play 7th and 9th chords during the verse or whatever just make them regular triads for the solo.
so then more notes will sound "out" of the chord so it will be easier.
=] thats gonna help me alot with improvising.
thanks
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#11
Quote by steven seagull
You're kind of doing it backwards, it's far easier to take a chord progression first and then write a lead line over it.
You could use counterpoint? But I doubt the T/S wants to learn counterpoint.

if you dont know theory, just use your ears, and what sounds good to YOU is all that matters.
Your ear will just tell you if something sounds right or wrong. It wont tell you exactly why or how its right or wrong. This is why writing music is a learned, not inherit, skill.
#12
Quote by demonofthenight
You could use counterpoint? But I doubt the T/S wants to learn counterpoint.

Your ear will just tell you if something sounds right or wrong. It wont tell you exactly why or how its right or wrong. This is why writing music is a learned, not inherit, skill.
Counterpoint is when the line is added to the cantus firmus, no? I wouldn't call TS's lead line a cantus firmus. It would, in this case, be like writing the cantus after the contrapuntal part. But hell, I don't know anything. *wanders off*
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#13
Quote by metal4all
Considering that's how you do it theoretically, +1

Isn't there many ways of doing it... which are theoretically correct? Just that some are easier than others.

Music is made up of 3 elements:
Rhythm
Harmony
Melody

I think that when it comes to composition you could start with any one of those.
Just that if you have a complex melody, it might be a bit more challenging to write a good sounding harmony to it that doesn't switch chords on every other note . Not that there's anything wrong with that.
#14
Quote by one vision
Isn't there many ways of doing it... which are theoretically correct? Just that some are easier than others.

Music is made up of 3 elements:
Rhythm
Harmony
Melody

I think that when it comes to composition you could start with any one of those.
Just that if you have a complex melody, it might be a bit more challenging to write a good sounding harmony to it that doesn't switch chords on every other note . Not that there's anything wrong with that.
That's like saying scales are built off of chords. Harmony defines melody, not the other way.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


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