#4
Without having the original files (wavs), I don't think you can do that. I know sometimes you can filter out certain frequencies so that you only get mostly 1 instrument left (or voice), but those aren't clean, you'll have some background music still in it.
#5
well how would I search for mp3s with just vocals? cuz people make remixes and stuff of songs, so they must get them somewhere. I tried google and yahoo, neither turned up anything useful.
#6
Quote by stratkat
well how would I search for mp3s with just vocals? cuz people make remixes and stuff of songs, so they must get them somewhere. I tried google and yahoo, neither turned up anything useful.


They use backing tracks that for the most part are made with Guitar Pro. But there are websites that have backing tracks (again, just mp3 versions of Guitar Pro midi's)
Last edited by xHellbound at Oct 27, 2008,
#7
Quote by xHellbound
They use backing tracks that for the most part are made with Guitar Pro.

It took me a while to realize that there was nothing special about backing tracks, they're just user-made GP files. Sometimes it's fun to remix your own.


Yep, open up the GP file you want and take the instruments out... If you actually want the guy singing its pretty hard to do.. You'll have to have pretty expensive software
#8
Quote by kool-kid54
Yep, open up the GP file you want and take the instruments out... If you actually want the guy singing its pretty hard to do.. You'll have to have pretty expensive software


Some old recordings have bass to one side and guitar to the other, such as Wicked World by Black Sabbath. Free guitar-less backing track w/ vocals.
#10
I'm sure professional remixers don't use Guitar Pro. I mean, sure, it is a useful tool, but not a piece of software one would use for "professional release" quality recordings.

You can buy karaoke tracks from iTunes. They are professionally re-recorded versions of songs with studio musicians without the singer, and are really quite close to the originals.

You can also use phase cancellation to remove vocals from the original song yourself, though a lot depends on how the song is mixed to begin with as far as how successful you will be.

Alternately, you can take the original recording and hope there is a few notes or a bar that you can splice out and edit, copy, paste together to develop a whole instrumental bass line for instance. Copy a few drum hits and re-sample and re-trigger them for new drum beats. That sort of thing.

An official remix will take the original source tracks and use those.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.