#1
I'm setting up a fender style tremolo. First time. I noticed that the strings were not dead center over all the pole pieces. Most, but not all.

So, then, I'm thinking that the strings are wider at the saddle than the nut, so they can't be in the center of all the poles. The strings spread out as they get towards the bridge, but the pups are all the same width.

I thought, mystery solved.

Then, I walk over and look at two different guitars hanging on the wall. Both, same scale, both with twin humbuckers.

One of them is similar, ie, strings not exactly over every pole, but the other guitar is almost dead nuts on, center of poles on both humbuckers.

Now I'm thinking that some pups have a little wider than others, with the poles just a little further apart to compensate for string spread.

I got out a caliper and measured...sure enough, on the guitar with all the strings dead center on both pups, the lower one was 2mm wider.

I'm thinking about changing the pups on my strat so all the coils are directly under the strings.

Is there a chart that has these details?
#2
Some pickups are called F spaced pickups , and others are standard spaced pickups. Those are the most common spacings. F spaced are farther apart.

ADDITIONAL INFO EDIT:

You are playing a Fender, which almost exclusively use F spaced pickups, and is likely why they are called F spaced.

Make sure your pickups are F spaced and they should sit above the poles
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Last edited by Dudage at Oct 28, 2008,
#3
There's only really two types of pickup spacing, regular and F-spaced. Regular is for a string spacing of 48mm, F-spaced is for 51.5mm...it's quite common to have an F-spaced pickup in the bridge and a regular one in the neck, but they might also both be the same, you just need to measure the spacing ofer both pickups.
Actually called Mark!

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