#1
Ok, I'm just needing some advice here. I can find ANY tone on my fretboard almost as soon as I hear it. But I cant name the note!!!!

Is there anything I can do to help myself name the note?! I'm sick of being able to find sounds, but not being able to name them. It would make things SO much easier.

Thanks.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#3
thats exactly how i am TS, but in my case, i have a lead guitarist that can name them for me lol
#5
Well, you have wat's called perfect pitch. Most people don't have it. You're right, you are a freak. But the good kinda freak.
#6
repetition. if you end up finding any tone the very first time you can memorize which notes they are.
#7
I can also do this. Finding the name is easy for me, because I have a trick. I form power chords and figure out the note from the octave. This works even if its the high E string. For example, you get the 9th fret on the B string but you don't know what note that is. form a power chord, that being the third note. Ex: xx689x since thats how power chords are when played that way. You know that 9 is the same note as the 6, which is Ab. If you don't know how to figure THAT out, then form a powerchord off that - 466xxx. You know that the 6 on the d string is the same as the 4 on the E string, which is Ab. this requires you know the notes on the top string.

Since that may be cnofusnig, heres another example.

4th fret, D string.
Form a power chord.
244xxx. You know that the 2 is a F#, so the 4 is the same - since full triad power chords are formed with the root note, 5th, and octave.

another example..

6h fret, hgih E string. Form a power chord.
xxx346.

figure it out, the 6 is the same as the 3. If you dont know the 3 (A#) work your way up.

Some people will get this, some not. Good luck
Last edited by Slash42x at Oct 28, 2008,
#8
^ im sure he gets the method, the thing though is, can you do it the very first time on every note? probably not. most people can't, i know i can nail it most of the time but not every time. if you can do it every time flawlessly without searching for it then you have whats called perfect pitch which is a curse and a blessing from what i hear.
#9
To the slash dude, I get EXACTLY what you're saying! Thanks

Quote by z4twenny
^ im sure he gets the method, the thing though is, can you do it the very first time on every note? probably not. most people can't, i know i can nail it most of the time but not every time. if you can do it every time flawlessly without searching for it then you have whats called perfect pitch which is a curse and a blessing from what i hear.


So, from this, I'm guessing I've got what's known as relative pitch?

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#10
If you can find any tone on the fretboard without playing it then that's perfect, or very good relative, pitch.

I can find any tone on the fretboard within about ten seconds but I'll have to play a note on the fretboard that's usually wrong before I can find it, because I just don't remeber what the notes sound like so I need some reference point.

However, this ability doesn't change much about you learning the notes on the fretboard. I suggest sight reading (you'll need to learn notation though) a lot of music because that way you can see the note and know it's name instantaneously and then with practise you will know where the note is on the fretboard quickly aswell.
#12
You're lucky; all you have to do is learn the fretboard and there are probably scores of lessons about that on the UG alone. Most of us have to develop that ability to play what we hear in our heads immediately or nearly immediately.
#13
Quote by valennic

So, from this, I'm guessing I've got what's known as relative pitch?


probably, if you fit the criteria of not getting it spot on everytime then yeah i'd say you probably just have really good relative pitch which i would probably rather have over perfect pitch.
#14
^
Second.
Got Death Magnetic a day early!

The Low-Cardinal of Zeppelinism - If you're a diehard fan of Zeppelin, join Zeppelinism here


Winner of the "Biggest Led Zeppelin Fuck" award in the CR forum (2 years running!)
#16
^ I have a friend with absolute pitch. It's pretty awesome whenever he can tell you that the computer noise is in E.

Hot tip: Best way to confuse someone with absolute pitch - say "Hey ____, what note is this? F!" Obviously, don't sing an F.
#17
Quote by Freepower
^ I have a friend with absolute pitch. It's pretty awesome whenever he can tell you that the computer noise is in E.

Hot tip: Best way to confuse someone with absolute pitch - say "Hey ____, what note is this? F!" Obviously, don't sing an F.


Can someone with absolute pitch tell you "Yeah, the computer makes a noise in 776.68 hz" or something like that?
Or does he flip out whenever you show him microtonal music?
#18
Can someone with absolute pitch tell you "Yeah, the computer makes a noise in 776.68 hz" or something like that?


They can name notes and produce pitches of those notes (correctly) with no previous reference tone. In the cass of 776.68Hz he would probably be able to say "That's a slightly sharp B" or something similar.

Or does he flip out whenever you show him microtonal music?


No, he's got a killer ear all round. He's the bassist I'm with on one of my youtube vids. That was one of his worst takes, but one of my better ones and it's still obvious he pwns.
#19
i think perfect pitch is overrated

you can only do so much with the ratio's for notes you get with a bass and a guitar you will never get 144 perfectly tuned notes on a 12 tet system so y does anyone even care is my question?

i don't know what i have but i HATE the notes that come out of my electric guitars i never play them.

strictly just to put music on here mostly jams and sometimes play around with stuff i have played around with on my acoustic but never sounds as nice and never as happy with it

the last jam i had a really hard time with and the whole thing sounds a little off to me and i mean besides the times when i actually just did go off key......... plus it sucked lol
song stuck in my head today


#20
perfect pitch - well of course you want what you don't have, so I'm jealous of anyone who has it! There is a guy at my work who has a condition that I can't remember the name of, but essentially it's a kind of super perfect pitch. An MRI showed that his hearing was actually connected to the visual part of his brain. He can do crazy sh!t like tell you what "color" the sound of the ceiling fan is, or whether his friends cat is hungry from the pitch of it's meow. But the problem is that if he is in a restaurant or some other place where there are lots of different sources of sound, he has a hard time because it is overwhelming to him to hear that many different sounds when he is so acutely aware of them. So, yeah, it is a double edged sword, especially in extreme cases like that.
#21
i mean ive been playing guitar for 9 years now so this might sound a bit prestigious, but i still dont get why new guitarist dont memorize the fret board. There are 12 notes. They repeat. Learn em.
myspace.com/soundsofmeta
#22
Quote by BBell
i mean ive been playing guitar for 9 years now so this might sound a bit prestigious, but i still dont get why new guitarist dont memorize the fret board. There are 12 notes. They repeat. Learn em.


yes. If you're in it for the long haul you should be able to instantly name what any given note on the board is without calculating it out, without using little tricks to think it through. Yes it's a pain in the ass to memorize, but you'll be so much better off if you do.

It's just like key signatures, and reading standard notation. Sure you can devise systems to be able to quickly figure out what the keys/notes are, but if you really want to be able to use them, you're going to have to get to where you can just see them and instantly know what's what, without a second thought.
#23
Quote by se012101
perfect pitch - well of course you want what you don't have, so I'm jealous of anyone who has it! There is a guy at my work who has a condition that I can't remember the name of, but essentially it's a kind of super perfect pitch. An MRI showed that his hearing was actually connected to the visual part of his brain. He can do crazy sh!t like tell you what "color" the sound of the ceiling fan is, or whether his friends cat is hungry from the pitch of it's meow. But the problem is that if he is in a restaurant or some other place where there are lots of different sources of sound, he has a hard time because it is overwhelming to him to hear that many different sounds when he is so acutely aware of them. So, yeah, it is a double edged sword, especially in extreme cases like that.


What you've just described is a superhero, your friend in work is a superhero, I dub him sonar man

Anyway I think I am the opposite I had to work quite hard to get a reasonably good relative pitch. 95% of the time now I can hit the note I want on the fretboard that I have in my head first time, still make the odd mistake but it's a semitone mistake usually. Took me like 3 years, so i'm pretty jealous of people who can do that right away.
#24
Quote by dullsilver_mike
yes. If you're in it for the long haul you should be able to instantly name what any given note on the board is without calculating it out, without using little tricks to think it through. Yes it's a pain in the ass to memorize, but you'll be so much better off if you do.

It's just like key signatures, and reading standard notation. Sure you can devise systems to be able to quickly figure out what the keys/notes are, but if you really want to be able to use them, you're going to have to get to where you can just see them and instantly know what's what, without a second thought.


Well, I've only ever really had one issue with the memorization.


I dont have a lot of time to do this, (although I am doing it slowly) so a lot of the time, I'm just going off of the pitch I hear. Plus, I use 3 or 4 different tunings, depending on what I'm playing....so it gets a bit difficult to memorize em all

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#25
Quote by se012101
perfect pitch - well of course you want what you don't have, so I'm jealous of anyone who has it! There is a guy at my work who has a condition that I can't remember the name of, but essentially it's a kind of super perfect pitch. An MRI showed that his hearing was actually connected to the visual part of his brain. He can do crazy sh!t like tell you what "color" the sound of the ceiling fan is, or whether his friends cat is hungry from the pitch of it's meow.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia

I was in a train recently sitting across from an art lecturer who had a thesis plan to read on art and synesthesia. Sounds pretty damn interesting, imo. Steve Vai would describe notes as colours as well, and it seems to be a common way for people who develop perfect pitch to refer to notes as colours.
#26
Quote by valennic
Well, I've only ever really had one issue with the memorization.


I dont have a lot of time to do this, (although I am doing it slowly) so a lot of the time, I'm just going off of the pitch I hear. Plus, I use 3 or 4 different tunings, depending on what I'm playing....so it gets a bit difficult to memorize em all



Nothing wrong with doing it slowly, that's how you know it will stick. It's not something that has to be time consuming. Think about where the notes in your most common tunings when you're doing anything that doesnt' require full mental capacity. Driving in the car? Think about the notes--but keep your eyes on the road. There are lots of places like this where you can just think about the notes as you go about your business, you don't need your guitar in front of you. And you should be thinking about it actively while practicing other things on the guitar, not cutting out time from your practice to devote soley to learning the notes. Keep finding the notes by ear, but once you've found them, name them.

If you switch tuning a lot, you're just going to have to not learn where each note is in the fretboard, but rather be able to name each note when you hear it. Problem solved

It'd probably be easier to start in standard tuning and then temporarily use those "little tricks and rules" to learn the others. After enough playing and thinking like that you'll eventually have it down for all of them.
#27
Maybe really experienced players know all the notes on the fretboard by heart. For me and you it's really useful to use pivot notes such as open string notes or that really basic C on the 5th string, 3rd fret. Then finding any note within seconds is piece of cake.