#1
I have this chord progression
and I think its in C major
but I'm not sure

The chords are:
C, D, G, Bm, Am, and Gm
#2
If it starts in C, then that's the key.
Although I don't get how you can have G and Gmin in the same progression...but to each his own. =)
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#4
yeah, the g and gm dont make sense, if there wasnt the gm then it would be g, but ive noticed that its kinda there, so idk. just find whatever note it resolves on...
Be still my heart, I hear your back cracking...


...sounds like music to me
#7
No, the key is not always the first note ( however this is usually a good method to follow when looking at music from the classical or baroque period).

A better way of finding out the key is to look at what accidentals you have in the progression ( sharps and flats).

Now are you sure about this progression because it dosnt really make that much sense, but yeh by looking at it, the key is either C major (with an F# for some reason) or A minor (relative minor).

Hope this was some help.
#9
It cant be c cuz the D would half to be minor, only a GMaj.
and the B would have to be diminished..

if you like the sound dont change it because its "not in key"
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#10
I guess
im just trying to find something that sounds good and is in key
but how do you tell which chords have to be minor to be in key
#12
If it starts in C, then that's the key.


The chord a song starts on has nothing to do with the key.

That progression is just strange, and not in a good way. It doesn't really "do" anything, but it resolves to C marginally more than it does to anything else. I strongly suggest changing that Bm to a Bdim. The Gm is an unusual sound, bu there's no reason you can't get away with it or even make it sound good.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Oct 28, 2008,
#13
im not worried too much about the key of the progression i gave in the first post

i wanna know how to tell which chords are in which key

how would i play bdim
Last edited by zachyh at Oct 28, 2008,
#14
Your progression is really odd, does it sound right???
Because.. If it was C major the chords would be as follows.

C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, B(diminished) , C.

However you have a D major chord and also a G minor.

To make a long story short you cannot really have Bm, Am and Gm together in one key.
This is because this does not occur according to rules followed when adding accidentals.

The general pattern for the chords of a key are: major- minor- minor- major- major- minor- minor(diminished)- Major.

If you wanted your chord progression in C major it would be more like: C, Dm, F, Bm or diminshed, Am, G.

hope that wasn't too confusing
#15
Select key. For example C Major.
Write out scale.
C D E F G A B C
Build Triads on every note of the scale.
CEG - C Major
DFA - D Minor
EGB - E Minor
FAC - F Major
GBD - G Major
ACE - A Minor
BDF - B Diminished

There's your "Diatonic Triads" in other words, chords in scale.

EDIT: FFFFFFUUUUUU- Beaten to it
#17
Quote by Boomjosh
Your progression is really odd, does it sound right???
Because.. If it was C major the chords would be as follows.

C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, B(diminished) , C.

However you have a D major chord and also a G minor.

To make a long story short you cannot really have Bm, Am and Gm together in one key.
This is because this does not occur according to rules followed when adding accidentals.

The general pattern for the chords of a key are: major- minor- minor- major- major- minor- minor(diminished)- Major.

If you wanted your chord progression in C major it would be more like: C, Dm, F, Bm or diminshed, Am, G.

hope that wasn't too confusing


This is true only to extent that certain chords can't be constructed from notes found within the C major scale. You can most certainly use any chord you want in any key, and indeed I can far more easily establish a tonality of C major with chromatic tones than I can drawing only on the notes of the C major scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#18
As true as this is Archeo
lets not confuse the poor guy lol
think he should stick to the scale for now
#20
Quote by Boomjosh
As true as this is Archeo
lets not confuse the poor guy lol
think he should stick to the scale for now


What I said it relevant to his query. He posted a progression only to be told that it can't be in a key because it contains chromatic tones. This is false.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#21
Yes i agree. All i was saying is that judging on what his theory knowledge appears to be like it is probably a better idea not to confuse him by making the theory more complex but instead just to keep it basic and say try and stick to the scale for now.
#22
im not confused
im learning all of this really fast actually
it all makes sense to me
#23
Quote by zachyh
im not worried too much about the key of the progression i gave in the first post

i wanna know how to tell which chords are in which key

how would i play bdim

Bdim
---4---
---3---
---4---
---3---
--------
--------
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#25
thanks guys
this is alot of help
ive taken some notes
and will post when ive got a good sounding progression
#28
^¿Porqué no?

(That means, "Why not?" in Spanish.)

Edit: That's directed to Boomjosh or whatever his username is (can't see it when you go to edit a post!).
#32
Quote by Froboarder
If it starts in C, then that's the key.
Although I don't get how you can have G and Gmin in the same progression...but to each his own. =)

Thats not always the case. Dont go by that rule. Its true most of the time.
#33
Quote by /-\liceNChains
Thats not always the case. Dont go by that rule. Its true most of the time.

Then I have been misinformed, I'll go study my theory again.
one_vision, Are you sure you aren't looking at it upside down?
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#35
Quote by one vision
^Top string = 4th fret on high e string?

That'd be a G#.

G#dim? I think not.
It is, however, a Ddim7, Fdim7, G#dim7, and Bdim7, as Sue said.
Admittedly I was wrong, though, about the Bdim (I'm tearing down the misinforming chord poster now)
Bdim
--------
--------
---7---
---9---
---8---
---7---
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
Last edited by Froboarder at Oct 29, 2008,
#37
Quote by one vision
^Yeah, I meant the top note is a G#.

Oh, well you're right in that perspective.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#38
This is bugging.

For the first 10 posts, the progression is in the key of G (C Lydian) with a chromatic tone. Rules can be broken.

EDIT: excluding post 6...
Last edited by Ssargentslayer at Oct 29, 2008,