#1
I'm doing a guitar exam, and as part of it I need to (in the words of the book) "explain the construction of minor 7#5 and minor 7b5 arpeggios". I have no clue how to 'explain' it.

I was never goo at theory, and stuff like this just seems pointless so I never really learnt it. Can anyone help me out please?

All I would be able to say is 'It's a minor arpeggio with the 7th note of the scale added in, and then the dominant note is raised/flattened by a semitone'. Is that all they're asking for?
#2
Quote by Jmz123
I'm doing a guitar exam, and as part of it I need to (in the words of the book) "explain the construction of minor 7#5 and minor 7b5 arpeggios". I have no clue how to 'explain' it.

I was never goo at theory, and stuff like this just seems pointless so I never really learnt it. Can anyone help me out please?

All I would be able to say is 'It's a minor arpeggio with the 7th note of the scale added in, and then the dominant note is raised/flattened by a semitone'. Is that all they're asking for?
Call the "dominant" note the fifth degree. Dominant is sort of wrong, as its the chord that falls on the fifth degree. Also, say it has a minor seventh added to it. 7th of the scale sounds a bit... unprecise? Take that with a grain of salt. I honestly dont know the specifics of how they teach theory.

I dont know, I sort of agree with you. Although all theory is usefull for something, examination boards and schools seem to teach theory for the sake of teaching and dont go into application (making theory not pointless) enough. Why learn something you dont know how or when to use?
#3
A minor 7#5 arpeggio is a minor arpeggio (root, minor third, perfect fifth) with a minor 7th degree and an augmented dominant added to it. And the same thing with the m7b5 arpeggio (except say flatted dominant). Try something like that
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
Last edited by Warheart1188 at Oct 29, 2008,
#4
Yeah that sounded a lot better than mine.

I don't know how grades work in America, but in the UK, if you haven't done grade 5 theory (kinda intermediate level) they won't let you enter into any grade higher than grade 5. I did grade 5 theory when I was 11 or something, and I didn't even do amazing in it. I think I got like 65 and the pass mark was 60. Either way, that was ages ago and I barely remember a thing. Stuff like this just goes straight over my head. I'm learning it for the sake of learning it, not because I know how to apply it, just like you said.