#1
I play the guitar for some years now and it the last month my E major string get broken while i loosed it and them I bought a new set and today my E minor strung broke as well so I was wondering how did that happened i thought to ask here

thx in adverse V
#2
Could be that you have a burr on the nut or the bridge. When you put new strings on, put some pencil lead in the grooves in the nut and bridge to lube the strings when you bend or tune. Since I started doing that I haven't broken a string.
#4
Quote by vasil
I play the guitar for some years now and it the last month my E major string get broken while i loosed it and them I bought a new set and today my E minor strung broke as well so I was wondering how did that happened i thought to ask here

thx in adverse V



just say big e string a small e string. major and minor are two different things completely unrelated to the strings
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#8
i remember (ages back) a mate of mine telling me that loosening a string which was previously under tension can cause great stress to it (which is somewhat counter-intuitive). he was doing engineering or something at uni.

anyway, it's only hearsay, but it's all i've got.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
how does a string break when you de-tune it??

i'll tell ya!

lets take a piece of guitar string, and bend it at a 90 degree angle. the molecules at the inside of the bend become compressed and more dense creating a harder section of that string. as we bend it back and then to the opposite side again, the molecules do not uncompress AND the other side also becomes compressed and hard.

now with both sides of the string crunched down and hard, the steel/nickel actually becomes very brittle and is now very prone to breaking.

in fact repeating this maybe.. 2 or 3 more times should be enough to finally snap the string.

now when its on a tuning peg, its relatively the same story.. but just not as intense since the tunings pegs don't bend the string at a sharp 90 degree angle. (except where it locks) this usually happens to older strings mainly AND if you're changing up your tunings a lot. Also, if you're breaking new strings like this, then its likely to be a defect in your bridge, nut, tuning pegs, or maybe even just a bad batch of strings.

hope this explains your question!
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
Last edited by Kivarenn82 at Oct 29, 2008,
#11
and sorry for the minor major part didn't thought that someone will get offended by that