#2
If you're referring to being able to hear different intervals, it just takes practice. Go sit down at a piano and play different intervals so you can hear what they sound like. Then have someone else do it while you try to identify the intervals. Or you can take some simple songs and try to relate them to different intervals. For example, I believe the Wedding March intro (you know the one, the one EVERYONE knows) starts off with a 5th interval. Not exactly sure, I don't have a piano here to check it. Hope this helps.
Gear List:
Yamaha SJ-180 Steel String Acoustic
2008 Ibanez S520
Peavey 6505+ 112 Combo
Peavey Vypyr 15W

Call me Erk.
#3
the song thing is what i meant, but i was referring to harmonic intervals which means when they are played together
#4
Quote by ac/guns n zep
does anyone know of good mnemonics to be able to hear and identify harmonic intervals?


Relative pitch training. Like the guy said, practice with a keyboard. Play the root and and interval and memorize it (minor 3rd, pefect 5th etc.)

It's actually fun to do with a friend
#5
when i learned the intervals i found it much easier to do with a song using that interval in my head, so i was wondering if anyone knew of any for harmonic intervals
#6
If you want to learn fifths you could take any song with power chords and listen to that, a power chord is built off the root and the fifth. But those songs generally have more distortion, so it's not going to help with your sense of pitch all that much. If I remember correctly Iron Maiden does harmonies in fourths...and I think the intro to Raining Blood by Slayer is in octaves. Nothing else jumps to mind though.
Gear List:
Yamaha SJ-180 Steel String Acoustic
2008 Ibanez S520
Peavey 6505+ 112 Combo
Peavey Vypyr 15W

Call me Erk.
#7
G-------------4
D-------4-6-7-6
A-4-5-7-5-7-9
E-5-7-9


^ These are 3rd intervals in A Major. You can play them as double stops like notated, or seperately.

I like your sig btw.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 30, 2008,