#1
I'm upgrading here pretty soon from my Squier Strat, and SP-10 amp.

I was going to get the:

Epiphone 1966 G400 SG
And probably swap out one of the pickups for an EMG if I can, for a more metal sound, then for the amp..

Peavey Vypyr 30W amp.

I don't know much about amps, that's why I'm asking. I don't know what to look for and such, I'd like to play rock, indie, and metal. I mainly play at home, but if I'd need to practice with my buddies in a band I'd like to hold my own. Should I get the 30W, the 75W, or a different amp all together?

Thanks for the help.
Last edited by xkxlxhx at Oct 29, 2008,
#4
actives sound bad through SS amp IMHO
Call me Justyn

╠═══════╬═══════╣
τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
╠═══════╬═══════╣
#5
Quote by Flying Couch
Should be excellent for an intermediate player. You don't need EMGs though.

That. Plus mixing active pups with passive ones is a pain in the ass.
Gear:
Electric
2008 Epiphone G400 Heritage CherryFUBAR
2008 Ibanez GRG 170 DX
2009 Cort KX1Q
2011 LTD H 351 NT
Randall RG 50 TC
Ernie Ball 11-54
Acoustic
Dean Markley
Dunlop 10's
#6
If you like the way the guitar feels/plays and sounds, then get it! I highly suggest playing the actual guitar you're going to buy. A lot of guitars are hit or miss. In particular, I've played some Epiphones that were horrible. The action was very high and could not be setup any lower without horrific fret buzz. On the other hand, I've played some that were great. Again, I can't stress to you enough that fit and finish can be hit or miss.

tone is preference, however... most will agree that active pickups sound horrible in solid state amps. Before deciding on EMGs, plug a guitar equipped with EMGs (most all EMG equipped guitars sound the same...) into the amp you end up buying and see how it sounds to you.

I'm not familiar with those particular Peavey amps... much less played one, but I see it's a modeling amp with some built in effects. Definitely a good choice for the jam at home musician. It should be versatile enough to keep you interested. Again, tone is subjective. If you like it, that's the most important thing.

Another to consider would be a Roland Cube 30. I used to have one but recently sold it to a buddy of mine.

in regards to the wattage, 30w solid state will not be enough by itself to play in a band. 75w solid state probably won't be too much louder. If I remember correctly, if you double the wattage of an amp, you gain approximately 3 decibels.

Hope this helps you out

edit- also remember that solid state amps typical lose sound quality as you turn them up. A 30w solid state cranked to 10 may be enough volume, but it will most likely sound horrid.
Last edited by perfec_circl at Oct 29, 2008,
#7
Quote by fantasyh
That. Plus mixing active pups with passive ones is a pain in the ass.


Yeah, it's like mixing oil and water together. The Vypyr seems like a good amp (from what they talk about) and the Epi SG's are all good. And I have EMG's on a Schecter through a Roland Cube 60, and it sounds awesome.
#8
Quote by Austyn6661
Yeah, it's like mixing oil and water together. The Vypyr seems like a good amp (from what they talk about) and the Epi SG's are all good. And I have EMG's on a Schecter through a Roland Cube 60, and it sounds awesome.

^so this is a really good example of tone being subjective.

Personally, I do not care for how active pickups sound on solid state amp (really... I don't care for how they sound in general).

However Austyn6661 loves his setup.

So basically... be sure to try out EMG pickups through the amp you end up with before buying them. You may like it. You might not. Just find out before you drop your hard earned money on it.
#9
Quote by perfec_circl
If you like the way the guitar feels/plays and sounds, then get it! I highly suggest playing the actual guitar you're going to buy. A lot of guitars are hit or miss. In particular, I've played some Epiphones that were horrible. The action was very high and could not be setup any lower without horrific fret buzz. On the other hand, I've played some that were great. Again, I can't stress to you enough that fit and finish can be hit or miss.

tone is preference, however... most will agree that active pickups sound horrible in solid state amps. Before deciding on EMGs, plug a guitar equipped with EMGs (most all EMG equipped guitars sound the same...) into the amp you end up buying and see how it sounds to you.

I'm not familiar with those particular Peavey amps... much less played one, but I see it's a modeling amp with some built in effects. Definitely a good choice for the jam at home musician. It should be versatile enough to keep you interested. Again, tone is subjective. If you like it, that's the most important thing.

Another to consider would be a Roland Cube 30. I used to have one but recently sold it to a buddy of mine.

in regards to the wattage, 30w solid state will not be enough by itself to play in a band. 75w solid state probably won't be too much louder. If I remember correctly, if you double the wattage of an amp, you gain approximately 3 decibels.

Hope this helps you out

edit- also remember that solid state amps typical lose sound quality as you turn them up. A 30w solid state cranked to 10 may be enough volume, but it will most likely sound horrid.


Yeah, I'm going to have GC order one in so I can play it before I buy it, I wouldn't want to waste $400, hah.

I liked the Vypyr because of all the presets, built-in distortion, and the size, I'd like something bigger than the SP-10 10W. Like I said, I don't really know what a solid state means or a tube or anything. I just read that alot of people were happy with "Peavey" amps, and for the size it looked fairly cheap in price. I asked about the band so I wouldn't have to drop another few hundred later on, but I guess I could tackle that when I get there. I'm still an intermediate player. lol

And I was saying about the EMG's because a buddy of mine told me the pickups that came with his G400 were mediocre, so I figured I'd keep a cleaner sound on there, and put a more hard, crunchy one on too, but I'm still pretty new to the whole "custimization" thing.

Pending this G400 blows me away when I actually get my hands on it, you're saying just leave it be and get the 30W? I still have no clue what a solid state means. =P

(Sorry if I came off bitchy, my buddys in the background playing a game, very, very loudly, and I can't concentrate.hah)
#10
I think the two should go together just fine without any major modifications to the pickups. Try out the gear and then if you really feel you need to modify your gear go ahead only you know if you don't like the sound of it.
BROCCOLIS
I ated them all.
#11
Quote by xkxlxhx
Yeah, I'm going to have GC order one in so I can play it before I buy it, I wouldn't want to waste $400, hah.

I'd say that's a good choice.

I liked the Vypyr because of all the presets, built-in distortion, and the size, I'd like something bigger than the SP-10 10W. Like I said, I don't really know what a solid state means or a tube or anything. I just read that alot of people were happy with "Peavey" amps, and for the size it looked fairly cheap in price. I asked about the band so I wouldn't have to drop another few hundred later on, but I guess I could tackle that when I get there. I'm still an intermediate player. lol

Solid state means the amp primary uses transistors in it's circuitry.

Tube means they use vacuum tubes in their circuitry.

Solid state is cheaper to build because... well... transistors are cheap and it makes the process a little easier. However, transistors clip the wave very harshly. This is why when you crank the volume on a solid state amp, it tends to sound... crappy.

Tube amps are a little more expensive. They're more desirable because vacuum tubes clip the wave in a linear fashion. The apparent volume of a tube amp is also louder. besides all that... the amp has more usable volume.

It gets more complicated, but if you want more info, I'd suggest google. I'm sure there's a lot of pretty diagrams and fancy scientific explanations out there

btw, don't count yourself out as an "intermediate player". The fastest place to learn and grow is in a band. Just my opinion there...

And I was saying about the EMG's because a buddy of mine told me the pickups that came with his G400 were mediocre, so I figured I'd keep a cleaner sound on there, and put a more hard, crunchy one on too, but I'm still pretty new to the whole "custimization" thing.

As others have said, mixing active and passive pickups may be more complication than you want. It's possible... but... meh. Why bother?

Here's my opinion based on experience:
Active pickups sound very sterile. It seems like they lack a lot of overtones that passive pickups have. The cleans are also horrid...

I've used various pickups combos in a few guitars. I used to have LTD Les Paul clone with a setup you may be interested in. A Dimarzio Super 2 in the neck and a Dimarzio X2N in the bridge.

Very nice... very HIGH output setup. Just something to consider.

Also, keep in mind that the tonal nuances between pickups will be less distinguished on a solid state (transistors, remember? ) amp. Someone in a different thread mentioned output being the most noticable change. This is very much true.

Pending this G400 blows me away when I actually get my hands on it, you're saying just leave it be and get the 30W? I still have no clue what a solid state means. =P

(Sorry if I came off bitchy, my buddys in the background playing a game, very, very loudly, and I can't concentrate.hah)

When I was in your position, I opted for a the 30w Roland Cube. It kept me entertained with amp modeling and built in effects until the day I got my Peavey Triple X.

I'd recommend getting the best sounding, most feature rich amp within your budget. Something that will keep you happy when your learning songs and playing around at your house. If they day comes that you're in a band and start gigging, then consider something else.

Didn't come off bitchy to me. Maybe I just have thick skin?

Take it easy
#12
I have tried a peavey vypyr on 2 occasions, once with a schecter hellraiser and once with a fender US standard SSS strat. It's a great modeling amp, but it was a bit confusing to try and figure out without a manual or anything.
The guitar should be fine, the 30w should be plenty loud, and you probably don't need new pickups, at least not right away.