#1
Ok, when cutting a neck for a scarf joint for a neck with a gibson style nut, should you cut for the scarf joint where the back of the nut is, so that the nut has a level place to sit? Or do I have no idea what im talking about?

Thanks in advance.
Quote by asfastasdark
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#2
typically, the scarf will begin around the second or third fret and then once the headstock is glued in place, you plane the additional surface flush to the rest of the neck. the nut sits on top of the scarfed and planed surface of the joint.

maybe this helps?

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#3
Ok. I was looking at the tutorial on PG and its slightly different, but either way its done, the nut should end up where the headstock starts to angle?
Quote by asfastasdark
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Walker Rose.
#4
The nut can go on the fretboard, too, like a fender.

Just FYI, the nut never goes on an angled surface, it is always level.
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#5
yea, they show it the other way... i don't like this way because you get a seam in your headstock. I do it like melvin hiscocks book says - which looks more like all of the scarfed store bought guitars i own. In the second picture, the nut would be parallel to where the bottom of the scarf joint meets the headstock.



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#6
what you do is when you plane your surface flat after you scarf, measure about 3/16" - 1/4" from where the flat surface begins and draw a line... that's where your fretboard goes. The 3/16" of flat space you have at the beginning of your FB is where the nut goes (gibby style)

as otter said, you can do a fender style FB mounted nut, too...
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Timpson Guitars and TDM Pickups rock ;D

I make guitars and pickups. I also make sh*t that'll blow you the f*k up as well as things that will rebuild you - I have the technology
#7
Ok so if i already have my scale marked out, can i leave 3/16 -1/4" for the nut and then cut for the scarf joint (im pretty much set on a gibby nut)? I think I'll do it the project guitar way, unless you can point out some flaws, because I have some zebrawood that I could cover the headstock with.
Quote by asfastasdark
+1. This man knows his ****.


Walker Rose.
#8
like i said, i'm doing it the way hiscocks book says which is identical to the way thats on all of my store bought guitars and the same way that the other builders on UG do it. I'm sure neither way is better than the other in most cases but for aesthetic appeal, i choose to do it the way i do it. Also, if you think about it, the joint should be the strongest portion of the wood... wouldn't you want the strongest portion holding your neck together to be the weakest link in the neck (the headstock joint)??? there are 2 reasons for scarf joints - 1) to save wood (you can use a smaller piece of wood with a scarf joint) and 2) for strength. how many gibson necks have you seen break vs the number of broken scarfed necks? I've dropped my guitars numerous times and have yet to break a headstock (knock on wood - no pun intended).

that's my $.02
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#9
Quote by walker-rose
Ok so if i already have my scale marked out, can i leave 3/16 -1/4" for the nut and then cut for the scarf joint (im pretty much set on a gibby nut)? I think I'll do it the project guitar way, unless you can point out some flaws, because I have some zebrawood that I could cover the headstock with.


your scale should be measured and marked after your board is glued to your neck and your neck is bolted in place (or set). Once that's done you can measure your scale.

what I do is i'll measure from the end of my board, down the centerline to the scale length that I want on my body, mark it, and create a perpendicular line in relation to the centerline of the body... then i'll go on stewmac and check their recommendations for bridge positioning for the style of bridge i want to use, draw it in AutoCAD and make a locating template for it based on the line plus compensation. then all I have to do is line up the body centerline with the perpendicular line, tape it in place and whack the center of the holes with a center punch and drill them out
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#10
Quote by nuthinbuttrubl8
typically, the scarf will begin around the second or third fret and then once the headstock is glued in place, you plane the additional surface flush to the rest of the neck. the nut sits on top of the scarfed and planed surface of the joint.

maybe this helps?




That's the way you see it on most electric guitars now days, but there are some electric builders, and most acoustic guys, cut it so the joint runs from the bottom of the headstock (right where is starts to curve in to the neck) and it runs up to just below the middle tuners


Edit: OK, I just read the rest of the thread.

I do it the second way. Both ways equally well. I like to have the joint on the headstock because with the shape of my headstock (and most acoustic headstocks) the bottom seem is completely hidden by the way the neck is carved. The top of the seam is covered by the headstock veneer, and if you add binding that pretty much eliminates a visible seem on the sides. There are a lot of people out there that have 2pc necks that think it's 1 pc because it's so easy to hide the seam
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Oct 30, 2008,
#11
yea, I kinda like the little teardrop shape you get from the way I do my scarf joints. I see where you're coming from with the headstock thing but the only time I've seen a joint like that was on an austin... most other guitars i've seen/own have it the way I do it - it's really a matter of preference but, as i said, I like the idea of the point of most stress being where the strongest portion of the neck will be - and that's the glue joint.

all I can say is MOAR PIKZ!!!!
Support your local luthier!

Timpson Guitars and TDM Pickups rock ;D

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#12
I'll see about some pics, maybe then we can figure out the best way for me to do this.
Quote by asfastasdark
+1. This man knows his ****.


Walker Rose.