#1
The difference between Direct 5ths/8ves and Parallel 5ths/8ves?

EDIT: It would be awesome if you could explain counterpoint too.
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Last edited by aznrockerdude at Oct 30, 2008,
#2
A parallel 5th/8ve is when two voices a 5th or 8ve apart move in parallel motion. They're easier to spot because you just have to go through pairs of voices labeling intervals and looking for 5 and 8 to repeat. A direct (hidden) 5th/8ve is when you approach the interval of the 5th/8ve through similar motion (voices move in the same direction): This still sounds like parallels, even the the original interval is different. Always approach the interval of a 5th or 8ve by contrary motion (voices moving in opposite directions) and you'll be alright.

Counterpoint: Buy a textbook, or, better yet, take a course.
#3
Quote by Nick_
A direct (hidden) 5th/8ve is when you approach the interval of the 5th/8ve through similar motion (voices move in the same direction): This still sounds like parallels, even the the original interval is different. Always approach the interval of a 5th or 8ve by contrary motion (voices moving in opposite directions) and you'll be alright.

Maybe I'm just slower than the rest of the pack, but what makes directs different from parallels?
Counterpoint: Buy a textbook, or, better yet, take a course.

I'm taking Music Theory AP in high school, just wanna get a glimpse of what's ahead of me.
RIP Jasmine You.

Lieutenant of the 7-string/ERG Legion

Quote by FaygoBro420
Yo wassup, I'm trying to expand my musical horizons if you know what I mean, so can anybody reccomend me some cool Juggalo jazz?
#4
AP theory does harmony / 4-voice but not species counterpoint. Or at least it did when I took it.

Anyway

An interval of a third moving to that of a fifth can sound like a parallel: consider

Bb --> A (descending stepwise)
G --> D (fourth leap down)

sounds like
Bb ---> A (same)
G > Eb > D (uh oh there's a parallel hidden inside)
#5
Quote by aznrockerdude
Maybe I'm just slower than the rest of the pack, but what makes directs different from parallels?

Parallels are when there is a fifth and each note moves in the same direction by the same interval to get another fifth interval

A Direct fifth is also called a hidden fifth or covered fifth. It is when you start with an interval and both voices move in a similar direction to end up on a fifth.

The difference is that with a direct fifth only the second harmonic interval is a fifth while a parallel fifth is a two consecutive fifths.

e.g.
Parallel fifth
|c - d| c to d is a movement of one step
|f - g| f to g is a movement of one step
F C is a perfect fifth each voice moves in the same direction by the same number of steps and arrives at G D a second perfect fifth.


Direct fifth
|c - d| c to d is a movement of one step
|e - g| e to g is a movement of one and a half steps
E C is a minor sixth each voice moves in the same direction by a different number of steps and arrives at G D which is a perfect fifth.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 30, 2008,
#6
That made alot of sense, thanks Nick_ and 20Tigers.

EDIT: I got another question though. Where can I find examples of counterpoints in modern music?

EDIT 2: I'm talking about the 'first species' btw.
RIP Jasmine You.

Lieutenant of the 7-string/ERG Legion

Quote by FaygoBro420
Yo wassup, I'm trying to expand my musical horizons if you know what I mean, so can anybody reccomend me some cool Juggalo jazz?
Last edited by aznrockerdude at Oct 30, 2008,
#7
Well counterpoint is when two independent melodic ideas are joined together and sound good.
There isn't much modern music I can think of that follows the strict rules of counterpoint (any species).

I don't know if Jimmy Page ever studied counterpoint but you could describe the outside voices (the highest and lowest voices) of the Stairway intro as an example of loose counterpoint particularly the contrary motion where the upper voice moves up and the lower voices descends chromatically.

I haven't really spent a lot of time studying modern music looking for counterpoint though so maybe someone else can offer some ideas that I haven't thought about.
Si