#1
Will 2008 guitars be more valuable than they are now (assuming inflation)?
Or will the only valuable ones be from the hard rock era? Discuss...
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#2
I was just thinking about this last night. I'm not sure, but it doesn't seem like people will want a Pete Wentz signature bass years from now. I don't think it'll be the same.
#3
They'll be 'vintage' then, so yes more expensive. Pending on the condition mind you. Also it'll help if say you have a 2008 Fender MIA Strat, and in 2030 Fender goes bankrupt and stops making guitars forever. Then it'll be worth a fair price more.
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#4
Well look at some stuff from the 80s... Considered to be classics by some already.

Many 80s Ibanez guitars are conisidered classics...

I'm sure some guitars will be seen as "vintage relics".
#5
I'm certain they will. 70's fenders and norlin-era gibsons were considered bottom of the barrel 15-20 years ago and they're commanding rather high prices now.
#6
I depends on the guitar. High end instruments that are kept in good condition will be very valuable. A guitars sonic capabilities change with time - if it's a good guitar, they'll change for the better, which is what makes vintage instruments so sought after.
A cheap instrument or a mid-level one will not keep it's value though, even if it is good.
#7
Im thinking like Agile and Schecters. Late bloomers into the mainstream (yes I know Schecters name has been around for awhile now.) So im thinking that the Diamond series well be up a lil more.
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#8
Quote by Down Shifter
Im thinking like Agile and Schecters. Late bloomers into the mainstream (yes I know Schecters name has been around for awhile now.) So im thinking that the Diamond series well be up a lil more.



Not quite sure about Agile, as they are rather unknown and low priced. But Schecter, yes.
Weekend Warrior
#9
I doubt it - part of the reason older guitars are rare and therefore valuable is because they were produced in much smaller numbers than they are today. There's also a degree of value inherent in the quality of materials used in certain instruments and also the craftsmanship.

Things like Agiles and the Schecter Diamond series guitars are mass-produced in huge numbers, they'll never become particularly valuable.
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#10
Quote by steven seagull
I doubt it - part of the reason older guitars are rare and therefore valuable is because they were produced in much smaller numbers than they are today. There's also a degree of value inherent in the quality of materials used in certain instruments and also the craftsmanship.

Things like Agiles and the Schecter Diamond series guitars are mass-produced in huge numbers, they'll never become particularly valuable.

The limited runs well be. Like the syns white and gold sig.
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#11
Yes they will be more expensive. Like the old super nintendo's only been out for about 15 years and are already vintage.

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#12
Anything that is quality now will be worth more in just 10 years. Squiers (Vintage Modified series, Classic Vibe series, Jagmaster) will probably be worth double what they are now seeing as the MIJ and Korea made Squiers are sought after.
Last edited by Miss G at Oct 31, 2008,
#13
Yes, and No. Depends on the demand of that model in the future. If nobody wants it (eg. 40 year old squier stratocaster ), dont expect it for its value to rise. If people want it,( say Fender Stratocaster that was produced in small numbers ), its value will rise, but its a hit and miss, just like the stock market.
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#14
Quote by steven seagull
I doubt it - part of the reason older guitars are rare and therefore valuable is because they were produced in much smaller numbers than they are today. There's also a degree of value inherent in the quality of materials used in certain instruments and also the craftsmanship.

Things like Agiles and the Schecter Diamond series guitars are mass-produced in huge numbers, they'll never become particularly valuable.


agreed.

just because something will be old, doesn't mean it'll be valuable.
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#15
Quote by Miss G
Anything that is quality now will be worth more in just 10 years. Squiers (Vintage Modified series, Classic Vibe series, Jagmaster) will probably be worth double what they are now seeing as the MIJ and Korea made Squiers are sought after.


sweet

Quote by ML_Guitar09
and in 2030 Fender goes bankrupt and stops making guitars forever.


Yeah, not gonna happen
#16
Quote by GuitarGuy X
If nobody wants it (eg. 40 year old squier stratocaster )

Vintage Squiers are commanding a high price at the moment
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#17
Quote by Down Shifter
The limited runs well be. Like the syns white and gold sig.
Not really. There are Limited Editions of Gibsons from the 70's that don't get prices any higher than the regular versions.

If a guitar is rare because the entire model wasn't made for that long, then sure, prices go up. But 'Limited Edition' versions of common guitars don't fetch prices any higher than usual, especially from copy brands, asian-made guitars, etc.
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#18
Quote by Swap-Meet
Yeah, not gonna happen

Hey, think about the biggest bank in America that everyone thought was never gonna collapse, you never know.

And I think it would depend on the guitar, and how much people want it. If it was say, a LP100, then maybe they would give it a miss, but say an Epi Elitist Les Paul may be more in demand, for example.

But oh well, shall we worry about this in 40+ years?
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#19
Well the mainstay brands will keep good value and maybe go up a little bit. I don't think were gonna see values go up to where vintage strats and LPs go now.
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#20
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Yes they will be more expensive. Like the old super nintendo's only been out for about 15 years and are already vintage.


And they're also like $30 used.


I believe it depends on the guitar itself, the demand, and how well the economy does. Currently, with the economy in a piss poor state a lot of stuff is selling way below normal. If say the economy rises extremely rapidly, we're going to experience inflation and the price of stuff is going to rise but it's affect on your bank account isn't.

Now if we were to just go by the value of the instrument and negecting inflation, it's going to be specific instruments such as the 20th anniversary Ibanez RG550xx guitars have already shown an increase in value by 50%. Guitars such as the Ibanez RG1570, although an excellent guitar, it's value isn't going to increase due to the availability.

There is also an optimistic and pessimistic way to look at it. I can see the pessimistic one becoming more realistic over time.

Optimistic: current guitar values will go up

Pessimistic: Guitars as we know it will be replaced by technologically superior guitars offering greater tones, a wider variety of tones, more adjustability, better build quality, better materials, and lower prices. Something along the lines of Parker's graphite neck, gibsons robot guitar, Line 6/Fender Variax/VG. I'm not saying these products are in any way superior to anything currently; however, you would be insane to say that modelers/preamps aren't more advanced than pickups in wood, and that they couldn't be improved upon.
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#22
Nothing made in China or Korea is going to be worth anything. There are just too many Schecters and such out there for there to be much demand. Look at the import guitars of the 1960s- Teiscos, etc. You rarely see those going for more than a few hundred dollars. In addition, guitar production is most likely going to keep moving out of the US, in order to compete with companies like Ibanez and Schecter and to be able to reach the price point where they can sell them to begininng and intermediate players. Nothing that they sell a million of is going to be worth much money; its simple supply and demand.
#24
Does anyone know how much my 1989 777BK Jem will be worth in a few years?
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#25
I'm thinking in 20 years how much will my Les Paul be. It's a 2005 Epi Les Paul, and after 2005 they stopped making mahogany body tops and bodies, and so began using mahogany bodies with alder tops, so maybe it could be worth about £400 by 2028?
#26
Quote by MESAexplorer
And they're also like $30 used.


I believe it depends on the guitar itself, the demand, and how well the economy does. Currently, with the economy in a piss poor state a lot of stuff is selling way below normal. If say the economy rises extremely rapidly, we're going to experience inflation and the price of stuff is going to rise but it's affect on your bank account isn't.

Now if we were to just go by the value of the instrument and negecting inflation, it's going to be specific instruments such as the 20th anniversary Ibanez RG550xx guitars have already shown an increase in value by 50%. Guitars such as the Ibanez RG1570, although an excellent guitar, it's value isn't going to increase due to the availability.

There is also an optimistic and pessimistic way to look at it. I can see the pessimistic one becoming more realistic over time.

Optimistic: current guitar values will go up

Pessimistic: Guitars as we know it will be replaced by technologically superior guitars offering greater tones, a wider variety of tones, more adjustability, better build quality, better materials, and lower prices. Something along the lines of Parker's graphite neck, gibsons robot guitar, Line 6/Fender Variax/VG. I'm not saying these products are in any way superior to anything currently; however, you would be insane to say that modelers/preamps aren't more advanced than pickups in wood, and that they couldn't be improved upon.


hit the nail right on the head
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#28
Quote by steven seagull
I doubt it - part of the reason older guitars are rare and therefore valuable is because they were produced in much smaller numbers than they are today. There's also a degree of value inherent in the quality of materials used in certain instruments and also the craftsmanship.

Things like Agiles and the Schecter Diamond series guitars are mass-produced in huge numbers, they'll never become particularly valuable.


This is a good answer. Think about this, you buy a 2008 Fender American Standard Stratocaster that is a massed produced instrument and there are literally thousands of them out there. Who cares really what will happen in 20yrs, Fender won't die I doubt that and the market will be flooded with them so the value won't be too high. I think that usually first runs, low serials, a small number of limited edition guitars, stuff like that will go up in value but not after a big decline. Put it this way, in 1984 you could of bought a Kramer Pacer in Canada for roughly $900. I know this cause someone on Ebay is selling that exact guitar with the original receipt. He's selling the guitar for $700 or so. $900 in 1984 was worth a lot more then it is now. Hardly an investment you'll make a killing off of and on top of that those guitars are no longer made yet its still lower. The company is now a shadow of its former self and owned by Gibson.
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#29
In my opinion, well, look at Gibson's new Robot- Gibson's moving toward more tech-y nonsense as it seems, if it catches on guitar designs could change drastically, unlikely as that is. In which case the guitars we know and love could become a lot more valuable over like fifty years.

Far-fetched, I know. Just my two cents.
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#30
^It's not really nonsense. It's one of the best guitars to record with due to the consistancy of the tuning.
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#31
Quote by Ippon
In 40 years, each of my $70 Squier '51s in mint condition will be worth $492.80 each at 5% rate of appreciation/inflation/etc.








For christ's sake change the tuners on the top one to black please, haha. I did on mine. '51's ftw baby! Not too sure about in 40 years - probably. I think MesaExplorer nailed it too but look how much change we haven't seen in the past 40 years. A lot of things aren't that different. IMO anyway.
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