#1
Well, the name is a good indication that I didn't start playing as early as I wish I would have. I turned 30 this past August and have been playing for about 8 months now. I'll save the rest of the intro for another time.

Let's get to it. I bought a Yamaha AES620 for my first guitar. I was able to get it at store "cost" for 359 bucks so I figured it was a decent deal. Anyway, I like it but I want some more versatility out of it.

I want to split coils in both humbuckers. I'm googling for the wiring schematics but am having a difficult time finding them.

It's got 2 humbuckers: Yamaha Alnico in the neck, and a seymour duncan jb in the bridge. 2 volumes and 1 tone knob. Each hb has 4 wires so I'm assuming no mods to them are needed.

I've found 250k and 500k push/pull pots on ebay, I just don't know which ones to get. From what I've seen here, people are saying 500k is better for hb, and 250k for sc. BUT, using 250k could make the split coil sound more like a true sc than a 500k would???

So I guess the main questions are: which kind of pots to get and what are some good resources for help on the wiring?

I don't know which pots in the guitar to replace, how to wire them to the switch, etc. I have soldered plenty so that won't be a problem.

I don't know which pots in the guitar to replace, how to wire them to the switch, etc. I have soldered plenty so that won't be a problem.

Thanks in advance for any help!
Last edited by LateStart at Oct 30, 2008,
#2
Quote by LateStart
I've found 250k and 500k push/pull pots on ebay, I just don't know which ones to get. From what I've seen here, people are saying 500k is better for hb, and 250k for sc. BUT, using 250k could make the split coil sound more like a true sc than a 500k would.

You're quite wrong; a coil split would probably sound better with 500k.
More K means more treble is let through, and a little more bass. 500k is advised for humbuckers because of their reserved top end, and 250 for strats to tame the harsh edges. So, you'll want as much treble as possible to make it sound more like a genuine strat.

Or at least, I think so ^^;

Don't know anything about wiring though.
#3
Wiring diagrams: http://www.seymourduncan.com/support/wiring-diagrams/

Pig pretty much got it on the pot question. Except that "genuine strats" have 250k pots.

It's a matter of taste, really. Most people won't hear any difference.
#4
Quote by Rock Pig
You're quite wrong; a coil split would probably sound better with 500k.


Was merely echoing what I found here. I claim to know nothing about guitars and the electronics associated with them.

Sounds like I'll just go with 500 then. Only one more question on that part. I've seen different types. Some say they are made for volume, some tone. Does it matter?

Thanks guys!
#5
the two kinds are audio taper and linear taper.

Try googling 'potentiometer taper explanation' or something for a more detailed description, but I'll try to give you the jist of it.

basically, in a linear taper pot, when it's turned a quarter of the way, the pot'll be at a quarter the total resistance. at half turn it'll be half resistance, ect.

In an audio taper pot (also alled log or logarithmic (sp?)), the resistance doesn't reach half until the pot is at about 3/4s of a turn. the resistance inreaces exponentioally.

The reason for this is that the way our ears hear 'volume' isn't linear. if you used a linear pot for volume, most of the change in volume would occur at the beggining of the pot's turn, with less difference in the last 3/4s or so of the turn.

Usually, linear's for tone, audio taper for volume. they'll also sometimes be labelled 'A' (for audio, and 'B' (for linear).

if you can only get your hands on one kind, it'd be best if you use audio taper for both rather than linear taper for both. preferrably, though, yeah.. what I said above.
#7
Quote by Invader Jim
In Europe, A is linear and B is log.

Now that I think about it, I remember hearing that somewhere before...


those crazy europeans....
Last edited by james4 at Oct 31, 2008,