#1
This is just a quick simple question. What key is crazy train in? Is it A major or F# minor?
Some parts sound like it could be minor but that main chugging riff sounds major to me. Thanks for the input.
#3
Yea I know that they are each other's relative major/minor, but from what I understand, if the song is in f# minor, you can't solo over it in a major.
#4
You can still solo in major. All notes will still be consonant. Actually when I'm solo over a minor progression, I intentionally put focus on the third, which would be the majors root.
#5
no just no.... it switches between F# minor and A major. they are not the same keys btw.
#6
They get the same markings on sheet music. I'm going to go ahead and say, 'tis the same key. But only to the point where if I say minor, I mean minor.
But, more importantly. Technically, I guess they're different, but what you use to solo doesn't matter.
#7
You can solo major over minor, it seriously doesn't matter much. It alternates between the relative major and minor.
#8
Let's think about this whole major/minor thing in a different light.

When you create a Dorian mode, you're flatting your third and your 7th. If you have a minor chord progression, but you solo using the major scale, it's going to sound horrible. Saying that you're using the relative major, I suppose, could come from the same thought process that when using a D Dorian mode you're basically playing in C, but I find it easier to think of mode/scales with the scale formulas. I think the official term for how I think of modes is derivative thinking... Whatever.

To answer your question, TS, the song switches between major and minor. The main chugging part is major, but the intro has more of a minor feel to it.
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#9
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
They get the same markings on sheet music. I'm going to go ahead and say, 'tis the same key. But only to the point where if I say minor, I mean minor.
But, more importantly. Technically, I guess they're different, but what you use to solo doesn't matter.

just because they get the same markings on sheet music doesn't mean they're the same. F# minor resolves to F#, A major resolves to A major. now for soloing if you try to "solo in A major over F# minor" and stick with A major you're never going to come to rest. ending a solo on a 3rd has an unresolved feeling to it
#10
Quote by z4twenny
just because they get the same markings on sheet music doesn't mean they're the same. F# minor resolves to F#, A major resolves to A major. now for soloing if you try to "solo in A major over F# minor" and stick with A major you're never going to come to rest. ending a solo on a 3rd has an unresolved feeling to it

Yes, but it can still be used to build tension. I was just messing around with a static D major drone backing, and basically what I did was start out in D major, then quickly switched to B dorian, back to D major, then to B aeolian, and then resolved the thing in D lydian. You cant really end on a minor like you said, but it still yields interesting results.
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#11
They get the same markings on sheet music. I'm going to go ahead and say, 'tis the same key. But only to the point where if I say minor, I mean minor.
But, more importantly. Technically, I guess they're different, but what you use to solo doesn't matter.


"Key signature" and "key" are completely different. A key signature is a notational device, nothing more.
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Nov 1, 2008,