#1
A while ago I had gone through a number of high e strings. From what I understand, I didn't let them "stretch" out enough. Needless to say I have a few sets of strings without a high e. So the past month or so I've had a B sized string in the high e string position. Will this ruin the nut ?

Also, when tuning with a tuner, I'm able to get the notes pretty close to the green dot. However, when I use the method of holding down the 5th fret and compare the note to the adjacent string, it doesn't sound right with the G and B string. The others sound ok. Is this a problem with my intonation ?

Thanks,
Scott
#2
the "b" sized string your using should be fine in the e slot. it would be just like playing w/higher gauge strings

to check the g to the b string play on the 4th fret of the g.
#3
Quote by Scott_K
A while ago I had gone through a number of high e strings. From what I understand, I didn't let them "stretch" out enough. Needless to say I have a few sets of strings without a high e. So the past month or so I've had a B sized string in the high e string position. Will this ruin the nut ?

Also, when tuning with a tuner, I'm able to get the notes pretty close to the green dot. However, when I use the method of holding down the 5th fret and compare the note to the adjacent string, it doesn't sound right with the G and B string. The others sound ok. Is this a problem with my intonation ?

Thanks,
Scott



Well i did the same, Also cause i ran out of E strings, And don't worry it won't damage you're nut since its like 4 mm bigger wich is practically nothing.

And yeah when you tune it you're shure to tune it to high E right and not another B string ?
#4
Quote by G-loony
Well i did the same, Also cause i ran out of E strings, And don't worry it won't damage you're nut since its like 4 mm bigger wich is practically nothing.

And yeah when you tune it you're shure to tune it to high E right and not another B string ?


A 4mm string? NOTHING??
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#5
It will make a groove in the nut, but it wont ruin it.

A B string isn't designed to be tuned that high, so you are definitely going to get intonation problems. Play the open string and then the 12th fret, you'll most likely notice that they are slightly different.

Get a new E string, they sell them individually in most guitar shops. Your constant breakings could be due to a number of things, have your guitar checked, the saddle is usually the problem. Not stretching the string enough will not break a good, new string, strings are designed to cope with all sorts of pressure so there is definitely something to do with the guitar that is causing premature failure.

Hope this helps.
#6
Although it shouldn't damage the nut, it might effect your intonation. If you're using .009s, the B string is probably .011", which isn't much larger than the E string, which is only .009". As long as it fits in the nut slot, don't worry about it too much. Using your tuner, check it at the 12th fret - the octave. See how well tuned it is there. If it's too far out, you can try adjusting your saddle to get the open E and 12th fret E in tune. Most of the time, when someone installs larger gauge strings on a guitar than it's designed to take, it requires having a guitar tech recut the nut. That larger string may pinch and bind in that smaller slot.

I've never had any problem with string breakage on any of my guitars. My son, who plays quite energetically, has a lot of problems breaking B and E strings. Breakage can be caused by over-aggressive playing and can also be caused by an improperly cut nut, since it can pinch the string and cause it to break as its tightened. You can usually hear this as you're tuning the guitar and the string suddenly changes pitch. Loosen the string and use a pencil (graphite) to "lube" the nut slot. The string will now change pitch smoothly as it's tuned. Another problem I've seen is on Epiphone and Gibson electrics with the screw-drive slot saddles. The metal slot where the string rides is a very narrow V shape and on the high E, if it's not perfectly smooth, it can cut into the string over time and weaken it. Eventually, this causes the string to break.

I have never seen a problem with not letting strings stretch out enough to cause them to break. Typically, if you install a new set of strings and don't stretch them, they'll quickly go out-of-tune as you're playing, since they're now stretching. This condition doesn't last long. I have heard of new strings breaking as they were being tuned. But I've only heard of this happening if the tuner was turned too fast.

Where are your E strings breaking? At the nut, the bridge or somewhere inbetween?
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Oct 31, 2008,
#7
Shouldn't be a problem.

"Not even Slinkys" use a 0.12 for the E string..
But where as "Hybrid Skinkys" use a 0.11 for the B string..

They all work fine on mine guitar though... except the Ibanez cuz of the damn Edge.
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#8
Sorry all, I should have explained that these are 2 different questions. I had the G to B string difference prior to using a B string in the high e string slot.

I'm using D'Addario EXL120 Nickel Super Light (09-11-16-24-32-42) on a squier strat if that helps. I didn't know that guitar shops sell high e strings alone. I recently bought a 10 pack of those guys.

The first couple of times I believe I broke high e strings because I was tuning it too tight. The other couple of times, I believe that I didn't break them in properly. I simply put them on and started trying full bends, it would go out of tune (or break), so I'd tune it again, but they would break shortly after. Again, I'm guessing just tuning too tight. They have broken around the tuners from what I recall. I started using the pencil lead in the nut the last few times.

So it seems that I have to check the tuning at the 12th fret for itonation and the 5th fret for regular tuning. Do I have that part correct ?

I actually don't want to take it to a guitar store because i want to learn/understand how it all works.

Thanks for all the replies,
Scott
#9
About the G to B problem. Try 4-0, 5-1, 6-2, 7-3, etc. just to be sure that the 4th fret isn't just the problem.

Yep, they sell them individually, make sure that if you ever need a replacement G that you ask for a 3rd or 0.016" string, very easy to embarrass yourself

If the intonation is off, the open string and the 12th fret on the same string will not sound the same, use an electronic tuner to examine the difference. If a string is tuned too tight it will pull the neck more and knock out the intonation, and if your intonation is off, your not going to be able to tune by fretting, instead use harmonics or an electronic tuner.

Fair enough that you wont take it to a guitar store because you want to understand whats wrong, but if you ask them nicely they will most likely explain to you in detail what is wrong.
#10
Quote by Scott_K
A However, when I use the method of holding down the 5th fret and compare the note to the adjacent string, it doesn't sound right with the G and B string. The others sound ok. Is this a problem with my intonation ?

Thanks,
Scott


don't know about the nut-thing but:

when comparing the G string and the B string you hold down on the 4th fret...
not on the 5th like on the others

hope I helped.
#11
Quote by slayaplaya
don't know about the nut-thing but:

when comparing the G string and the B string you hold down on the 4th fret...
not on the 5th like on the others

hope I helped.

Lol, I never even thought of that, thats some BAD intonation if theres a semi-tone difference
#12
I'll check out the 4th fret and 5-1, 6-2, 7-3, etc. Never thought of it that way. I thought it was always the 5th.

Gotta love G strings

Thanks again,
Scott