#1
Okay, I admit, I had posted a previous post a few days ago that I rushed because i was at school but here is a better example. Click on the species5.mid link

counterpoint

(I didn't know it was called counterpoint/countermelody) - thanks 12345abcd3



I want to know the theory behind it especially when 3 guitars are involved

When both guitars are playing their own melody, the notes that are played at the same time by one guitar and the other have to be in harmony, right? Because it wouldn't sound all that great.

What about the notes played in between? Are they notes played within the scale they're in? I'm totally stumped.

Any feedback is appreciated.
#2
Hmmm..... the link you posted seems like pretty basic counterpoint, except for the note choices going from the first bar into the second where you have some pretty strong parallel motion. I found it a bit funny that they would put something with questionable voice leading like that up as an example. Nonetheless...

If you had three guitars playing, they would all need to be harmonized in relation to each other with respect to a common tonality. At that point, I would move away from traditional counterpoint approach towards a conventional tonal harmony approach. Here's why....

Conventional counterpoint says (among other things) that if one voice moves up, the other voice must move down, and vice-versa. This is why the movement in your example from the first bar to the second is questionable. But.... if you have one guitar moving upwards from one note to the next, and the other guitar moving downwards from it's note to the next... what would the guitar in the middle do? It would have to go up or down (well... or stay the same....), but that would mean somewhat parallel motion between it and one of the other guitars!

Moving towards conventional harmony, you will study proper voice leading (which has a lot in common with counterpoint) and what kinds of chords move to what other kids of chords in which keys. You will learn how to set up and resolve a suspension, how to deal with inversions (and use them effectively), etc. as a means towards achieving all of this.

In simplest terms, if you had a guitar piece in E, one guitar could be playing an E, and the other guitars could be playing G# and B. Combining these notes would give you an E chord. Wow... really simplest terms.... but that is the bare-bones gist of it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
Conventional counterpoint says (among other things) that if one voice moves up, the other voice must move down, and vice-versa. This is why the movement in your example from the first bar to the second is questionable. But.... if you have one guitar moving upwards from one note to the next, and the other guitar moving downwards from it's note to the next... what would the guitar in the middle do?


It is vastly more complicated than "one voice moves up, the other moves down". What do you think happens in four part writing?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Yes, it is vastly more complicated than that. I was just trying to keep the answer simple for a person who is largely unfamiliar with the discipline.

Once you get into four part writing, it starts to take on more attributes of tonal harmony as I described above.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Traditional counterpoint is fine with parallel motion as long as it's done with 3rds and 6ths.

Similar and contrary motion should be balanced. If one dominates your lines get boring and lose independence.