#1
Hey guys,
I recently found out my bassist's dad had a roland vs1680 in his attic, so he's letting us use it now. It's from 1999 but still pretty beastly. The samples on it sound great and everything, but yesterday when i tried recording a guitar part, it sounded really crappy. It sounded like, sort of distant and not great.

I mic'ed my amp with a Sennheiser 815S. I had my amp (a crappy MG30DFX) at about half volume and the preamp on the recorder right below peaking. I also tried having it well under peaking to see if it made a difference. I miced it right up next to the screen on the edge of the speaker (where the "sweet spot" is) but it didn't sound anywhere near pro quality, not even amateur quality..

help me fix this guys! what can i do to get better quality?
My Guitars:
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Epiphone AJ
Ibanez Strat Copy

Amps:
Orange Tiny Terror Head
Old beaten up Peavey cab
Marshall MG30DFX
#2
it might seem redundant to pick on your amp.. but what are the settings on it?

there will be no existing sweet spot, if you have your treble blaring and your mids scooped!

and that particluar part may not be a sweet spot at all. always try shifting it around, experiment with mic tilts or head on positions.. just keep at er!
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#3
That "sweet spot" is mainly when you use 2 or more mics and they cancel/phase each other out. For example, when James Hetfield records, he has like 8 mics going.

Not to undermind your intelligence, but record two tracks, and pan them hard left and hard right. Then see how crappy it is. The guy up there said about your highs blaring and mids scooped will be a big factor. And it's true, so bare that in mind.

When I used to mic my amp I'd switch off with SM57's, and my Sennheiser e609. I placed it about 2 inches away from the cloth and just inside the axis.

EDIT: Don't think you're going to get an amazing tone when you record everything yourself, people go to school to become sound engineers to capture the sound professionaly. So don't get frusterated, it's gonna take a long time to get your recordings up to par.
Amps
Mesa Dual Recto 3 Ch
Peavey 6505 Combo

Cab
ENGL E212VH Cab

Guitars
Epi Explorer
Schecter Damien 6
Squier Strat (signed by Rob Zombie!)

Pedals
ISP Decimator
Dunlop Crybaby Original
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensenble
Boss GE-7 Equalizer
Last edited by StillSoundRG at Nov 1, 2008,
#4
Quote by StillSoundRG
Don't think you're going to get an amazing tone when you record everything yourself, people go to school to become sound engineers to capture the sound professionaly. So don't get frusterated, it's gonna take a long time to get your recordings up to par.


+millions.

i never went to school per se.. but after reading hundreds if not thousands of books, and just straight up experimenting and doing the whole late night mad scientist thing.. you're just eventually going to find out all on your own, what works and what doesn't.

if you keep at it, literature, time, and experimentation are the only things that are gonna teach you how to get awesome at recording.

in my own recordings.. a lot of people leave comments about the quality, but i can still listen to them now, and figure out what went wrong, and how i can improve them.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#5
Kivarenn, do you have any literature to suggest to me that was most helpful?

also, i had the bass on the amp at half and treble at a little over half. There are no mid controls on the amp.

as for this talk about the sweet spot on the speaker... do you think not hitting it exactly will make a huge dramatic decrease in sound quality?
My Guitars:
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Epiphone AJ
Ibanez Strat Copy

Amps:
Orange Tiny Terror Head
Old beaten up Peavey cab
Marshall MG30DFX
#6
try to find "home recording for dummies" at your local chapters or any major chain bookstore in your area.

it brushes on everything in that book.. you might FEEL like a dummy picking up that book in public, but your new recordings will speak for themselves.

and the 'sweet spot' is just one of those things... its hard to explain, but every square inch of that speaker pushes out a slightly different sound then the next bit.. so if you have a microphone really close mic'd it mainly going to "hear" the spot its pointed at. if you're standing above your amp with the speaker pointing at your ankles and figure "hey i got a good sound now" you'd end up being really shocked to drop a mic in front of it and find out its a completely different sound than what you heard a second ago.

it'll be easier to hear the differences if you're monitoring through headphones, just pick out your E and move the mic around while listening to the monitored tone on your headphones. you'll hear ALL sorts of different freq's being sweeped as the microphone picks up different parts of the speaker at all different angles!
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.