#1
I need some tips on how to write a guitar solo
i play indie/rock for my band and im quite fast but not anything special so any help will do thanks
#2
scales. start with the major or the minor pentatonic.
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#3
Yeah, I don't get what your question is?

When you play a solo you identify what chords the place you are gonna add your solo goes in, and the find out what key it is in and then find out what scale to play (pentatonic, minor, major, blues etc.)
#4
try playing through scales starting with quarter notes and then mix up rythms
this may help give some inspiration

oh and if your trying to write a solo for a specific song play scales in corresponding keys
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#5
i know how to put scales next to chords and that but i wanna know what scales are good for indie/rock music and stuff like should i do some repititon right at the start, middle,end stuff like that
#6
I think with indie you tend to be limited to the pentatonic shapes and blues shapes, but i meen other scales could work, it just depends how generically indie you wanna sound or if you want to go outside the box a little.

#7
i wanna go out the box like tbh but what are good sounding scales and erm if just found its phrasing please give me some advice on phrasing coz i dont know what it is or how ya do it
#8
Well my friend all the scales can sound good in different instances, whilst at the same time certain scales may sound very out of place in some songs.

I suggest you look at modes, Ionian, Lydian (major) (Dorian (for a minor key)) these modes dont sound too out there really and should still fit nicely if used correctly in your pieces.

As far as phrasing goes, this is something that is hard to explain really because this will only come with practice. Phrasing is to do with the times when you choose to play notes and also the notes you choose to play and the way you play them. Good phrasing will develop with time, but to some extent it is a very natural thing and has a lot to do with how you feel what you write.

Its very hard to give you advise on phrasing. The best advice i can give you really is dont go all out all at once, dont play a million notes all the way through your solo. Build it up and if you wanna play very fast at the climax do so ( i know i enjoy playing fast), but one properly chosen and well played long note can sound just as effective; that is phrasing my friend.

hope that was at least a little understandable haha and helpful

#9
Quote by Boomjosh
Well my friend all the scales can sound good in different instances, whilst at the same time certain scales may sound very out of place in some songs.

I suggest you look at modes, Ionian, Lydian (major) (Dorian (for a minor key)) these modes dont sound too out there really and should still fit nicely if used correctly in your pieces.

As far as phrasing goes, this is something that is hard to explain really because this will only come with practice. Phrasing is to do with the times when you choose to play notes and also the notes you choose to play and the way you play them. Good phrasing will develop with time, but to some extent it is a very natural thing and has a lot to do with how you feel what you write.

Its very hard to give you advise on phrasing. The best advice i can give you really is dont go all out all at once, dont play a million notes all the way through your solo. Build it up and if you wanna play very fast at the climax do so ( i know i enjoy playing fast), but one properly chosen and well played long note can sound just as effective; that is phrasing my friend.

hope that was at least a little understandable haha and helpful


i understand a lot of it but not completely good advice
#10
Quote by Boomjosh
Well my friend all the scales can sound good in different instances, whilst at the same time certain scales may sound very out of place in some songs.

I suggest you look at modes, Ionian, Lydian (major) (Dorian (for a minor key)) these modes dont sound too out there really and should still fit nicely if used correctly in your pieces.

As far as phrasing goes, this is something that is hard to explain really because this will only come with practice. Phrasing is to do with the times when you choose to play notes and also the notes you choose to play and the way you play them. Good phrasing will develop with time, but to some extent it is a very natural thing and has a lot to do with how you feel what you write.

Its very hard to give you advise on phrasing. The best advice i can give you really is dont go all out all at once, dont play a million notes all the way through your solo. Build it up and if you wanna play very fast at the climax do so ( i know i enjoy playing fast), but one properly chosen and well played long note can sound just as effective; that is phrasing my friend.

hope that was at least a little understandable haha and helpful




One thing I would like to add to this is that ending your 'phrases' with a root note makes it sound like a period in a sentence. It ends the current thought, and the next thing you start to play is something different with relevance to the last sentence.
#11
just try to feel the music...you can get a better and more original sound if you just let it flow out of your hands and mind without trying to think about it too much.
#13
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#14
in my band (we play indie/rock) im the lead guitarist but should i have a solo in all the songs or some or none? coz its tough coz i dont listen to the music but i like playing it so what should i do
#15
Well, you don't exactly NEED a solo on every song, because if you do, they better be damn good, or else you'll sound repetitive. As far as learning what do to. Learn Pentatonic and Chromatic Scales.
#16
You don't have to learn scales to write a solo unless you plan to improvise it. Just think of a guitar melody that adds to the song. And don't force a solo if the song doesn't call for it.
#17
Protip; Don't write it. Improvise it like all good rock solos are originally.
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#18
Whatever you do make sure it is melodic. You can even incorporate the melody of the song at the beginning of the solo for example.
#19
write bar by bar, that's all, make sure you can actually write it and not only memorize it, try different stuff, i change my solos each time we play, i just make some sort of structure and improvise from that
#20
Phrasing comes with pratice, however if you wanna hear the king of Phrasing then listen to some Jeff Beck.
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#21
phrasing is by far the most important thing in a solo. you can be playing 3 or 4 notes, but if its phrased well (not necessarily slow or bluesy) it can make people feel much more then scalar runs.
as for note choice, think of the chord progression, and the notes in each chord. then think of notes outside the chord that will get a sound you want (flat 3 or sharp 4). Think of what notes will get you the sound you want, but more importantly what you hear in your head. your guitar should sound like its singing, and you should not be afraid to be simple.