#1
I'm looking at two pedals (Big Muff and Bluebeard). Apparently they have a reputation for scooping mids.


I'm also looking at a bass or two (Gibson/Epi Thunderbird). Apparently they are very mid/low heavy.


My question is this:


Would using these two (or really any scooping pedal and a mid-heavy instrument) in conjuction be a good idea (ie. Bass compensates for lack of mids and sound awesome) or bad (ie. sounds bad for whatever reason)? Amp notwithstanding.


Please to thank you, in advance.
#2
Just get an EQ pedal if you want mids scooped. The Big Muff is more for getting a heavy low end which makes it acceptable for bass players. I don't know what you're using the distortion for but when I use it for soloing (similar to Cliff) I set my EQ to 400Hz at max and kill every other frequency, gets a good lead bass guitar tone.
#3
The distortion is going to be used for general purpose and occasional leads.


I want mids in my tone. It helps me be heard. What I'm asking is if using a mid-heavy guitar will make an actual difference.
#4
It can make a difference but not as much as an EQ. My Boss EQ pedal make my crappy $300 bass sound like one 3 times its value. I got a 2nd EQ pedal that I use for leads and I kick it in when it's solo time.
#5
*sigh*

Anyway, the Muff does not have a reputation for scooping mids, not at all. The reputation is that it's a high-pass filter.

The T-Bird's not a mid-heavy instrument, it's a bottom heavy instrument (tonally, and bloody top heavy structurally. I played a Gibson version today). So yeah, it's the same idea, just in a different frequency spectrum.

A frequency spectrum that's bloody essential to our role as musicians. You can't really 'compensate' for something that's being cut out. It's not the same as adding a bottom heavy pedal to a thin instrument. That just means it's cutting out even more of the signal. Not only that, the Thunderbird isn't that complicated in the mids and the trebles, so you're signal won't be as intense as you thought it'd be.

Wow, I got through that without a hint of flame. I'm going to vomit now.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#6
If you play near the bridge on the Tbird, and use mainly the bridge pup, you can cut through quite nicely...I don't think the bass will be a problem.
Nope, no sig here.
#7
Quote by thefitz
*sigh*

Anyway, the Muff does not have a reputation for scooping mids, not at all. The reputation is that it's a high-pass filter.

The T-Bird's not a mid-heavy instrument, it's a bottom heavy instrument (tonally, and bloody top heavy structurally. I played a Gibson version today). So yeah, it's the same idea, just in a different frequency spectrum.

A frequency spectrum that's bloody essential to our role as musicians. You can't really 'compensate' for something that's being cut out. It's not the same as adding a bottom heavy pedal to a thin instrument. That just means it's cutting out even more of the signal. Not only that, the Thunderbird isn't that complicated in the mids and the trebles, so you're signal won't be as intense as you thought it'd be.

Wow, I got through that without a hint of flame. I'm going to vomit now.



The internet is a cruel mistress. Apparently people talk about wrong information to confuse lurkers like myself..

And I mostly used the Muff for an example, as I am most likely getting a Blubeard for the extra lows and what have you.


So whats the verdict in "non-jargon"? Is this a bad idea? Could it be fixed with the aformentioned EQ?
#8
I would just like to add that Big Muffs and the Bluebeard (a high end Big Muff clone)do scoop a bit of high mids out, as well as the Big Muff cutting low end out (Bluebeard does it to a lower degree).

However, I would not get a T-bird for playability reasons, rather than it's poor tonal balance (muddy rumble). If you like the Big Muff tone, I would suggest getting the Bass Big Muff. For its price, it is hard to beat it. bassfuzz.com has reviews of other fuzz pedals, including a lot of Big Muff clones (including the Bluebeard). Have a look on that.

You should not have to pick a bass in order to make a pedal acceptable, or visa versa.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
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Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
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+1
#9
Yes - I mean if you're in the market for a high-end fuzz like a Bluebeard, there's always the Wooly Mammoth, which is an 'actual' germanium diode fuzz as opposed to the fuzz-lite Big Muff. That may or may not be your thing, though.

Personally, I think EQing is for timbral changes, notsomuch actually adding of frequencies. I really think you'll dislike your tone if you crank the panties off of the low end - not to mention stress the hell out of your amp.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#10
However, the Woolly Mammoth doesn't play nice with active basses (though I've heard sticking a 15k resistor or a suitable pot in front of it can bring the impedance of the bass signal to suitable levels). For a $300 fuzz, you should wait until you have a really good bass before you make any constraining decisions now.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#11
Quote by gm jack



You should not have to pick a bass in order to make a pedal acceptable, or visa versa.



Both the Bluebeard and the T-bird are both pieces of equipment that I really want, and have wanted for a while.

I just wanted to know if I would be screwing myself. It has nothing to do with "Well I want A but it only sounds good with B, which is only ok".


I just noticed that when I was playing with a band awhile ago (using a Little Big Muff) whenever I'd turn it out I'd lose a bunch of mids/cut. So I was hoping to find some sort of way around this.
#12
For the price, you can do a low better than a thunderbird (either epi or Gibson) unless that happens to be the niche sound you are after.

As said before, www.bassfuzz.com has a review of the Bluebeard, so that may be worth checking out. Otherwise, if a pedal cuts something, there isn't much you can do. You can run a clean signal with it, or you can do some drastic EQing.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#13
I think ~$300 for an Epi T-bird is pretty damn good. I'd be skeptical of something's quality if it was less than that.


But thanks for the advice.


Since I don't spend a lot of time research guitar/tone relations, can anyone tell me what basses/pickups are mid-heavy? I wanna say a Fender J, but I don't recall.