#3
Quote by Kartman

how???? its not funny im only 14 been in a band for a couple of months i dont know tell me please
#4
Sellout, play corporate music that teenage girls like.
You may have a 10 x 10 stack of marshalls and i may only have one, but mine goes to 11.... Beat that
#5
Sorry Paul.... some people are just too used to hanging out in the pit. When they come here, it takes a bit for their IQ to warm up a bit.

Answer coming... just thought I'd share this while everyone is on line and maybe checking back.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
You have asked a *huge* question - and one to which there is no simple answer that works for all people all the time. As much as Keegan has a point, I don't feel he expressed it with an intention to help as much as he did with the intention to make himself look smart.

Nonetheless.... here goes.

In short, there are three steps:

1. You have to write songs that will be pretty much guaranteed to make a ton of money for a lot of people. That could mean a lot of things, but generally means the following:
-sound modern, yet be in a style that the average person will like
-melodically strong, if not totally unforgettable
-lyrics that elicit a feeling in the listener
-deal with topics that are either universal in nature, or are at least topical for the time and demographic
2. Present those songs to the public in a way that will knock their socks off. It can't be just okay. It has to be friggin' brilliant. That means:
-vocals are in tune
-instrumentation is well chosen, well arranged, played with good tone, and tight like crazy.
-energy, passion, feeling, entusiasm
-produced to sound like a million bucks (depends on genre here....)
-be presented by someone who fits the criteria of 'young and beautiful.' If you're ugly, you ain't gonna make it, (you'll be a tough sell at the market), and if you're over 30, you missed the bus.
3. Work hard enough that you can call music not just a hobby, but a full-time job. Be prepared to sink 60 hours a week into your music, between writing, recording, rehearsing, performing, promoting, marketing, taking care of business, building relationships., etc. There are a few important factors here:
-a lot of it is luck.
-getting your demo or CD into the hands of those that can help you the most is what you need to do. That may mean moving to the cities they live in - LA, New York, London, etc. Network like crazy.
-being the kind of person that people WANT to help. Nobody likes an arrogant prick.
-if you can sell 10 000 copies of your CD, a record company will surely see the earning potential of what you're offering, and will gladly help you out. If you can't sell 50 copies, why the hell would the record company think investing in you is a good idea.

Tie all this together with the guiding wisdom along the lines of: Record companies want to help you make money. However.... their first priority is making them money. They won't lift a single finger or invest a single dollar unless they are pretty damned guaranteed that it will be worth their while. Would YOU bet $1 Million on a horse that you weren't sure was going to win? Given that it costs about that much money to break a band in terms of marketing and promotion, you have to think that they wouldn't bet $1M dollars on a horse they aren't sure is going to win either.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Nov 3, 2008,
#7
Quote by axemanchris
... and if you're over 30, you missed the bus.


I think the standard is more like 40 these days.
#8
I'd guess it would go more the other way these days. It keeps getting younger. Maybe 25?

Who is getting signed for the first time to a major deal in their late 30's.... or even in their early 30's for that matter?

Sure, bands like RHCP and U2 can be well into their 40's (or even beyond?) and still be popular, but as far as first getting signed... I don't see anyone getting signed over 30 I don't think.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
You have asked a *huge* question - and one to which there is no simple answer that works for all people all the time. As much as Keegan has a point, I don't feel he expressed it with an intention to help as much as he did with the intention to make himself look smart.

Nonetheless.... here goes.

In short, there are three steps:

1. You have to write songs that will be pretty much guaranteed to make a ton of money for a lot of people. That could mean a lot of things, but generally means the following:
-sound modern, yet be in a style that the average person will like
-melodically strong, if not totally unforgettable
-lyrics that elicit a feeling in the listener
-deal with topics that are either universal in nature, or are at least topical for the time and demographic
2. Present those songs to the public in a way that will knock their socks off. It can't be just okay. It has to be friggin' brilliant. That means:
-vocals are in tune
-instrumentation is well chosen, well arranged, played with good tone, and tight like crazy.
-energy, passion, feeling, entusiasm
-produced to sound like a million bucks (depends on genre here....)
-be presented by someone who fits the criteria of 'young and beautiful.' If you're ugly, you ain't gonna make it, (you'll be a tough sell at the market), and if you're over 30, you missed the bus.
3. Work hard enough that you can call music not just a hobby, but a full-time job. Be prepared to sink 60 hours a week into your music, between writing, recording, rehearsing, performing, promoting, marketing, taking care of business, building relationships., etc. There are a few important factors here:
-a lot of it is luck
-getting your demo or CD into the hands of those that can help you the most is what you need to do. That may mean moving to the cities they live in - LA, New York, London, etc. Network like crazy.
-being the kind of person that people WANT to help. Nobody likes an arrogant prick.
-if you can sell 10 000 copies of your CD, a record company will surely see the earning potential of what you're offering, and will gladly help you out. If you can't sell 50 copies, why the hell would the record company think investing in you is a good idea.

Tie all this together with the guiding wisdom along the lines of: Record companies want to help you make money. However.... their first priority is making them money. They won't lift a single finger or invest a single dollar unless they are pretty damned guaranteed that it will be worth their while. Would YOU bet $1 Million on a horse that you weren't sure was going to win? Given that it costs about that much money to break a band in terms of marketing and promotion, you have to think that they wouldn't bet $1M dollars on a horse they aren't sure is going to win either.

CT


Bolded for emphasis, you can be brilliant and if you aren't what the record company think are "in", then that's it. And even if you do get a deal, the chances of getting beyond the first single or album are slim.
#11
+1 with Sam. Needed to be brought up explicitly.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
What about that old guy on X-factor? It looks like he might get his first record deal when the show ends.
#13
Quote by BrickIsRed
What about that old guy on X-factor? It looks like he might get his first record deal when the show ends.


And within a year he'll be forgotten
1 2

Little solace comes
to those who grieve
as thoughts keep drifting
as walls keep shifting
and this great blue world of ours
seems a House of Leaves

My Rig
Quote by Will Swanson
HeavyReverb = Hero of The Pit 2010.
Quote by I-Shot-Jr
You sir are my absolute hero.
#14
Listen to chris, he knows what he's talking about.
It's also worth mentioning again that seeing as how a company will be investing in you, you have to show them that you are easy to work with, so be polite, honest and down to earth with everyone you meet, the only time you should be posing is on the stage and in front of a camera.
As chris says, they need to know that you are a viable band for selling tunes and merchandise and making money, so if you can first sell a hell of a lot of tunes under your own steam and make a good name for yourself on the gigging circuit, the chances of you getting signed up will improve.