#1
Hey, Im the lead guitarist in my band and I play solos that are restricted to a scale usually following a harmony change of that same scale (for example the rhythm will be playing something on E and I will be soloing with an E phrygian Dominant then the rhythm will change to a G based riff and I will solo on G phrygian dominant etc). I've been able to make some awesome solos with this but the problem is that I know there is so much more potential, I remember watching a Satriani instructional on 'Surfing with the Alien' and he uses heaps of different scales that are still somehow relevant to the rhythm. Any help with playing solos that arent restricted to the same key/scale?
#2
Learn the rules thoroughly, only then will you be able to effectively "break" them. One thing that many guitarists do to break out of the scale problem is the use of modes. Although modes are very complex, I believe they are very useful.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#3
I've never quite understood modes 100% I basically just broke them up and treated them as separate scales only commiting to memory the ones that i liked (such as Phrygian). I know how they all derive from the major/ionian scale but I don't know how to mix and match with different rhythms. For example if i was to play a D Dorian solo over a C Major riff would this fit or not?
#4
People argue about this all the time. My view is that you can't possibly play a D Dorian solo over a C major riff, you'll will just be playing C major and stressing the wrong notes.

The scale that should be used is determined by the chords.

A good modal vamp is I II I II repeat, which would imply the Lydian mode.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#5
For example if i was to play a D Dorian solo over a C Major riff would this fit or not?


It would fit because you'd just be playing C major. If you want to play D dorian, you need a riff that suggests D dorian.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.