#1
So I have a Korg tuner that you can manually and go through and select what frequency you want to tune to. At least I think thats how it works or whatever.
When I used to jam with a guy I worked with at a bar, he always talked about tuning to 460, but everyone else always mentions at least once that they use 440.

A, I have no idea what theyre talking about.

B, I have no idea what the difference is.

How does this work?
#4
440 Hz is the frequency of the sinal wave of the tone of the A string. If that dude tunes it to 460 Hz, he's playing out of tune. Nothing wrong with it offcourse, but its not as it should be.
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#5
The number is the frequency rate of the sound wave indicating the pitch. 440 is the standard for an A4 in western standards.
#6
If you want to tune to C standard for example, what frequency would you have to use?
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#7
just tune your lowest string to D instead of E, dont worry about frequencies

*EDIT*
Nevermind, you changed your post.
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Last edited by LP_CL at Nov 4, 2008,
#8
Quote by lokster
If you want to tune to C standard for example, what frequency would you have to use?


That would be 262Hz if tuning down, or 523Hz if tuning up.
#9
Quote by lokster
If you want to tune to C standard for example, what frequency would you have to use?

440 hz.

that setting on the tuner only changes what the A above middle C is. it then works everything else out from that.

if you changed the 440 to the pitch of the C (whatever that is) it'd come out weird.

you only really need to change that setting if you're playing with an instrument that's tuned to something else but s difficult to tune eg. a slightly sharp piano, you might have to change the setting to 460 for that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concert_pitch that should explain things a bit better.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#10
Quote by Lemoninfluence
440 hz.

that setting on the tuner only changes what the A above middle C is. it then works everything else out from that.


if you changed the 440 to the pitch of the C (whatever that is) it'd come out weird.

you only really need to change that setting if you're playing with an instrument that's tuned to something else but s difficult to tune eg. a slightly sharp piano, you might have to change the setting to 460 for that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concert_pitch that should explain things a bit better.

exactly
#11
440 is the standard amount of hz that you tune to.
if you went up to 460, you would be tuning slightly sharp.
a lot of metal bands like metallica and megadeth would speed up there songs a little bit using some recording thing, and to make your guitar sound like that, you tune it slightly sharp.
if you have ever played along to and justice for all, you would notice that your guitar(if in standard tuning) would sound slightly off. This is because they sped it up. So, dont tune to any of that music either, because you will be slightly sharp..unless you want to be slightly sharp.
#13
nope 5th fret high e in standard tuning.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#16
Quote by JuanitoAlberto
and for Eb?

you dont seem to understand. if you have a tuner that reads all the notes you dont have to change the freq to tune to Eb
you just tune your strings to Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb
if you change the freq so that A is Ab then you would have to tune to E A D G B E. either way you have to tune it to something so theres no point in changing the freq
#17
Quote by JuanitoAlberto
and for Eb?


That Eb is still in reference to A 4XX (whatever you use), so the frequency doesn't need to be changed.
#18
If you don't know some basic theory, here is all you need to know: Make sure the tuner is calibrated at 440hz for A. I think it's a bit easier to understand the whole hertz thing after reading some theory, but the reason 440hz is the standard is so that you don't get a choursy effect in a band like you might in a well, chorus, because people sing an A at different frequencies. Having that standard in guitars eliminates that. Once you learn a bit more, you can figure out how changing that influences your sound and how it can be used. I think it is simpler though to just leave it be at 440.
#19
just leave the freq. at the standard 440.

once you understand more you can alter it to your needs, though kind of unlikely.

sometimes i tune at umm 400? im not sure havent dont it in awhile.
gives a nice sound for my friend and i in d standard
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#20
people change the pitch a little so it's almost impossible to achieve the exact sound. i think you have to have a trained ear to hear the extra "heaviness" of tuning down like 10 Hz. maybe like 30-40 would alter tone. Dimebag tuned retarded a lot. like 1/4 step or something. It's just a preference i guess.
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#21
Quote by apak
people change the pitch a little so it's almost impossible to achieve the exact sound. i think you have to have a trained ear to hear the extra "heaviness" of tuning down like 10 Hz. maybe like 30-40 would alter tone. Dimebag tuned retarded a lot. like 1/4 step or something. It's just a preference i guess.


10 Hz lower than 440 is 39.8 cents, which is quite noticeable.

My personal preference is A 432.
#22
LP_CL Wrong - In standard tuning, the open A string (5th string)  is 110hz. The fifth fret on high E string (1st string) is 440hz. The 2nd fret on the G string (3rd string) is 220hz.
#23
Before this gets locked out...

A=440Hz is considered standard. If you're walking into my band, which has keyboards and horns, you'll be following a 440Hz standard. 
#24
I'll put it this way, you leave your tuner at the 440 reference. It's what everyone else uses. Then you can tune to whatever you want (E, Eb, D, C, drop B, etc) but the 440 reference remains. If you were to change to 430 or something else and tune to E you would sound different than your other guitarist who has his guitar tuned to E using 440. 

Sure, you can change it to 432 for instance, that's a well-known alternative, and then tune to whatever you like, just know that you're going to be off compared to others.

But it's not the case that in order to change the tuning to Eb or some other, you have to somehow figure out a new reference frequency.
#25
Quote by Lemoninfluence
440 hz.

that setting on the tuner only changes what the A above middle C is. it then works everything else out from that.

OP's question was already answered nearly 10 years ago. ^^

Thread shouldn't've been bumped.
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