#1
What is the reason behind the different scale shapes(like the 5 within one scale)? Is it just to change how it sounds, or does it work better over certain chords in different shapes or something?
#2
It's because the notes of any scale appear in multiple places on the fretboard, nothing more. There's no "reason" behind the shapes themselves, they're simply an aspect of the scale.
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#3
So knowing all the shapes allows you to play in the same key anywhere on the fretboard?
#4
Yes. But more importantly, knowing the notes on the fretboard lets you play in any key besides playing shapes.
#5
Quote by madmax12893
So knowing all the shapes allows you to play in the same key anywhere on the fretboard?

The two go hand in hand but Rave765 has it the right way round - the scale is what came first, the pattern is almost irrelevant...it's just where that scale happens to appear on the guitar.

Scales are music theory which is universal...a major scale is the same on any instrument, or indeed even without an instrument. It's a root note followed a sequence of notes that follow the pattern WWHWWWH, where W is a whole step or 2 semitones and H is a half-step or one semitone. If you find all your instances of a particular note on a guitar and follow that pattern you'll end up with a scale pattern.
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#6
^ Yes, this man is right. I'm just a beginner myself still playing around with the minor pentatonic scale in Am right now, but I've learned the notes all over and it really makes things clear.. you should do it if you haven't already, TS.

It seems like quite a daunting task at first but once you get it it'll all make sense. To start you could learn the E and A strings at first, then use octaves for the rest. You can also use octaves for the D string, but you'll have to move one fret up.
#7
Thank you both. I kinda knew bits and pieces of what you were saying already, but you connected it all together very well. I will try to start thinking of them more as a group of notes in the pattern rather than just a shape on the fretboard.
#8
Have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the Columns section, they explain things much better than I can.

Scale patterns will come into their own when you're actually using a scale when playing, however there not something you *need* to learn on their own because learning the scale from the notes will ultimately teach you the patterns anyway.

Also, take some time to examine the relationship between chords and scales - if you draw out all of the chords of a key as full 6 string barre chords you'll find they account for pretty much every note in the corresponding scale pattern.
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