#1
So I've been looking at getting an amp,and I've noticed that theirs tube amps, and like cabinets and heads...so my question is this"

Can u play out of a head without a cabinet?
What does "ohms" mean?
what are the "tubes" in an amp? how do they affect the sound?
and non amp related, what does tr;dr mean?

thanks.
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#2
you dont play out of a head you connect it to a cabinet, it acts as a sort of filter to make your guitar worthy of a cabinet
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#3
Il answer the first question NO!

Wikipidia sed this for tubes
In electronics, a vacuum tube, electron tube (in North America), thermionic valve, or just valve (elsewhere, especially in Britain) is a device used to amplify, switch, otherwise modify, or create an electrical signal by controlling the movement of electrons in a low-pressure space. Some special function vacuum tubes are filled with low-pressure gas: these are so-called soft valves (or tubes), as distinct from the hard vacuum type which have the internal gas pressure reduced as far as possible. Almost all depend on the thermal emission of electrons, hence thermionic.
#4
Quote by nowa90
So I've been looking at getting an amp,and I've noticed that theirs tube amps, and like cabinets and heads...so my question is this"

Can u play out of a head without a cabinet?
What does "ohms" mean?
what are the "tubes" in an amp? how do they affect the sound?
and non amp related, what does tr;dr mean?

thanks.


tl;dr = too long, didn't read.
i used to be a mod, then i took an arrow in the knee.
#5
Quote by nowa90
So I've been looking at getting an amp,and I've noticed that theirs tube amps, and like cabinets and heads...so my question is this"

Can u play out of a head without a cabinet?
What does "ohms" mean?
what are the "tubes" in an amp? how do they affect the sound?
and non amp related, what does tr;dr mean?

thanks.


1: No. The "head" is purely the amplifier, while the "cabinet" is a box containing speakers.

2: Ohms are a measurement of resistance. You need to make sure your head out put and cab input match in ohms. Common values would be 2, 4, 8, or 16. Most have two options for input and output, they will be clearly labeled.

3: Before the advent of transistors, tubes were used to do shit in an amp. I'm not sure exactly what, but the term "tube" refers to glass vacuum tubes that make sound, the other kind is solid state. Solid state amps use transistors.

Commonly, tube amps are preferred for their vintage sound, warm tones, and some other shit... can't remember.

4: Too long, didn't read.

This does not belong in this forum. It belongs in Guitar Gear & Accessories. Please remember in the future.
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#6
Valve's are used to amplify sound, like transistors, except valves clip smoother, with more harmonics.
#7
^ Ohh, yeah.

Thats why overdriven tubes sound secks, and overdriven SS amps sound t3h br00tals.

Thanks for clearing that up.
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#8
thanks guys..learned lots here
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
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#9
Quote by Øttər
^ Ohh, yeah.

Thats why overdriven tubes sound secks, and overdriven SS amps sound t3h br00tals.

Thanks for clearing that up.


No, it's soft clipping as opposed to hard clipping, instead of soft clipping as opposed to brutal clipping. Soft clipping is just a different type of waveform, and has a different sound. It does not mean that your distortion is weaker. And most people prefer overdriven tubes because of this, the fact that there are more harmonics, and because they sound more "vintage," as noted before.

The transistor was invented in the 1940's, and it replaced pretty much every vacuum tube. Computers used to have vacuum tubes, now they all had transistors. The chips that you might see inside a computer are actually just networks of many many transistors in combination with various other parts. Amps were replaced with solid-state amps. Transistors are found in cameras, microphones, etc. They were smaller, more stable, etc. But they were not preferred in amps because of their audio qualities.
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Last edited by asfastasdark at Nov 5, 2008,
#10
^ Thats what I meant. I just worded it wrong.

I seriously know exactly what you're talking about.

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Otter, you're my new god.
#11
Well, before transistors were invented, all amps had tubes. Then when transistors came, they were the newer technology and are better for most things, but for guitar amplifiers, tubes are considered by most people to give a better tone.