#1
Can anyone point me in the direction of a lesson or something that will teach me to read music? I can read tabs, but I mean the actual notes; A, A#, B, Cb, C, and so on and so forth.
#2
First of all, B and Cb are the same note. There are no flat or sharp between the B and C, and between the E and F.

Use the searchbar or Google. I bet that at least half of the 10 first links you'll get on google while searching it will be pretty good to lessons about it, and that you'll get plenty of stuff to learn from that.
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#4
Quote by XDream_TheaterX
First of all, B and Cb are the same note. There are no flat or sharp between the B and C, and between the E and F.

Use the searchbar or Google. I bet that at least half of the 10 first links you'll get on google while searching it will be pretty good to lessons about it, and that you'll get plenty of stuff to learn from that.

This is my moms work computer, so I can't go too many places on it, but I don't think she'll mind something for music theory, so I'll try it.
#5
Quote by XDream_TheaterX
First of all, B and Cb are the same note. There are no flat or sharp between the B and C, and between the E and F.

That's quite wrong.

Anyway, start by learning the clefs. Treble clef for example is also called a g clef, because the note it (well the curly bit in the middle) is on will always be a G. Bass clef means an F. I'm sure you will be able to find some good lessons on UG or elsewhere.
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Gear:
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Orange Tiny Terror >
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#6
Quote by XDream_TheaterX
First of all, B and Cb are the same note. There are no flat or sharp between the B and C, and between the E and F.

Use the searchbar or Google. I bet that at least half of the 10 first links you'll get on google while searching it will be pretty good to lessons about it, and that you'll get plenty of stuff to learn from that.

Stop filling his head with silly things.
Yes, they are the same pitch in the western 12-TET system, but they are two different notes.

If you notated it in treble clef, B will be on the 3rd line up, while Cb will be on the3rd space. same type of example with E and Fb. E will be on the first line, Fb will be in the first space. When you get to actually writing and studying sheet music in keys other than C major/A minor, you'll get what i'm saying. So please, unless you have/are studying music theory beyond this website, stop trying to teach it.
#7
EGBDF are the names of the lines on the treble clef, FACE the spaces are easy.

Kind of sing that and it will stuck in your head for the rest of your life

and theres your notes starting from the bottom of the staff to the top, efgabcdef


------F----------------------------------------
E
----D------------------------------------------
C
--B--------------------------------------------
A
-G---------------------------------------------
F
-E---------------------------------------------


I would really suggest going to buy a book at your local music store for this though.
#8
^that's not strictly true all the time. It is possible to place the clef on any line of the stave, but generally, that is a good method for memorizing the notes.
A metal band?
Gear:
A Guitar with an LFR > Korg Pitchblack > Behringer EQ > Hardwire CM-2 Overdrive Boss SD-1 > Hardwire CR-7 Chorus>
Orange Tiny Terror >
LzR Engineering 212 cab

My other amp can run Crysis