#1
In my audition packet its say:
"Major and melodic minor scales; edited by Andres Segovia (up to four sharps and flats)."

So.. Whats the "edited by Andres Segovia (up to four sharps and flats)." part?

I googled it and a UG lesson came up but it wasnt helpful.. anyone familar with this?

Google also showed book results but i dont have money for the book and one of the sample pages was just scales going more than one octave.
I know my scales fine but is there a certain way this Andres Segovia guy does it,
or is it more like a scale sight reading test?

-thanks
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#2
Quote by victoryaloy

Google also showed book results ... and one of the sample pages was just scales going more than one octave.


Yep. You found it. It shouldn't cost you any more than ten bucks, I wouldn't think.

Quote by victoryaloy

I know my scales fine but is there a certain way this Andres Segovia guy does it,


Yes. He was a pretty good player. A lot of people consider him a credible source.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
Yes they are referred to as segovia scales they have certain fingerings and position shifts and very between 2 and 3 octaves depending on which string you start on. This book has them it cheap too.

http://www.amazon.com/Diatonic-Major-Scales-Andres-Segovia/dp/1598060597
Originally posted by arrrgg
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#4
Yep. That's the one I have too.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
^^

CT is this it?

Link


Edit:

Or anyone that has the book or has seen it.
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#6
Yep. That's what the inside looks like. Maybe not the exact same edition or whatever, but that does seem to be it - giving the fingerings and positions a quick eye-ball-going-over.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
thanks!

I can read all the notes and everything but what i cant read is the spanish stuff..

C dur - Do major is C maj

a mol - La minor is def not A min

e mol - Mi minor is def not E min

Edit: Perhaps Mol is melodic Minor?
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#8
Hmm, as far as I know, mol is not Spanish. There is bemol, but that means flat. Not minor.


In spanish you'd have:

C major -> Do mayor.

A minor -> La menor.


Melodic minor would be indicated as menor melodico and harmonic would be menor armonico. Pretty much like English.
#9
Quote by axemanchris

Yes. He was a pretty good player. A lot of people consider him a credible source.

CT

thats an understatement.
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#10
Often auditions, exam syllabuses etc just give a reliable source or publication for required works.

Segovia's happens to be a reliable set of scale fingerings.
Personally I find there is room for improvement on some of his solutions and IMO have seen superior publications.

Basically it covers 2 and 3 octave scales major and melodic minor, I can't remember if he included harmonic minor.

Anyway, I wouldn't loose any sleep over it, if you know sensible fingerings for the scales up to the required number of sharps etc and which utilise the greatest range available (three octave where possible) then if I were you, I'd just use them.

Any auditioner who insisted on Segovia's fingerings, over other sensible and working fingerings is a pedant and probably unworthy of studying under. If in doubt why not contact the institution and ask if any sensible solution is permited.

EDIT: I ought to alert you to fact that Segovia advises different right hand formulas (i,m,i,m or m,a,m,a or i,m,a,i,m,a, etc) and also different rhythmic formulas to practise the scales with for technical development. Whether or not you will be asked to perform these formulas may be an important consideration.
Last edited by R.Christie at Nov 5, 2008,
#11
Quote by aetherspear
thats an understatement.


.... I know. I was being funny and seeing how long it would take for someone to call me on it. My degree is in classical guitar. Segovia is the ultimate master, followed by John Williams. Both of them are nothing short of absolutely brilliant.

@R Christie - I'd be careful about one thing here. If the audition requirements say they must be the Segovia scales, then you'd best check before taking the liberty to not use the Segovia fingerings. You're also working on the assumption (fair though it is, but far from a guarantee) that the person auditioning you will be the person who instructs you for your instrument. When I auditioned for my degree program, it was a panel of three judges - one was my instructor, and the other two were professors of the department who were not guitar majors.

Good call about the importance of the right hand, and for suggesting "check to be sure."

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by axemanchris
.... I know. I was being funny and seeing how long it would take for someone to call me on it. My degree is in classical guitar. Segovia is the ultimate master, followed by John Williams. Both of them are nothing short of absolutely brilliant.

@R Christie - I'd be careful about one thing here. If the audition requirements say they must be the Segovia scales, then you'd best check before taking the liberty to not use the Segovia fingerings. You're also working on the assumption (fair though it is, but far from a guarantee) that the person auditioning you will be the person who instructs you for your instrument. When I auditioned for my degree program, it was a panel of three judges - one was my instructor, and the other two were professors of the department who were not guitar majors.

Good call about the importance of the right hand, and for suggesting "check to be sure."

CT


I'm going for classical guitar too. If you don't mind me asking, what song(s) did you play for your audition?
and also any pointers?

Edit:
I actually had a sit down with the auditioner and talked to him about the different major and he said that the requirement in the packet are recommendations..
but the thing is i dont know much about classical and i now only have 10 day til my audition. But i have 8 hours a day to practice (minimum).
So i want to impress them as much as possible and i dont know how to sight read (well i do but i suck.. so i;m gonna lock down on the scales)
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Last edited by victoryaloy at Nov 5, 2008,
#13
Ten days is probably too short to learn anything totally new.

NEVER FORGET that it is more effective to play an easier piece well than to play an ambitious work badly. So don't play beyond, or even at the maximum limit, of your ability. Believe me.
#14
right now i have Bouree by J.S. Bach and i have it down pretty good..
but i also have a prelude that is a much simpler song than Bouree, but i dont know if i should pitch it because the mistakes in the Prelude are much more noticeable than if i were to mess up Bouree. And also with a prelude i'm thinking that they might just look for timing and rhythm, and how fluent it sounds and i'm using a steel string so its gonna sound choppy.

any recommendation??
to give you an idea it took me about a week to perfect Buree so anything about that skill level.. maybe a little less.
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
#15
Quote by victoryaloy
right now i have Bouree by J.S. Bach and i have it down pretty good..
but i also have a prelude that is a much simpler song than Bouree, but i dont know if i should pitch it because the mistakes in the Prelude are much more noticeable than if i were to mess up Bouree. And also with a prelude i'm thinking that they might just look for timing and rhythm, and how fluent it sounds and i'm using a steel string so its gonna sound choppy.

any recommendation??
to give you an idea it took me about a week to perfect Buree so anything about that skill level.. maybe a little less.

Which Bouree? The one in Emin from first Lute suite is a good choice for exactly the (good) reasons you give. He wrote many bourees though, they are dances in two four that start on the second half of the second beat.
But do yourself a favor and borrow a classical guitar for a month.
#16
No idea what I played now.... that was....19 years ago. (holy crap...)

It would be something like this, though:
John Dowland - Allemande (My Lady Hunsdon's Puffe) - Gr. 8
Villa Lobos Etude #1 or #3?? - gr. 9
Fernando Sor - Theme and Variations of Mozart's Magic Flute - Gr. 10

....I know I did the Dowland. There might have been one of the more difficult Sor studies in there too (or instead), but that list is at least comparable to what I would have played.

Ten days, though.... even if you're a real hot-shot player, don't even try to learn one of those pieces in ten days. For serious.

You might have to do what I did and audition well enough to show that you're serious, but not well enough to get in. At least you'll get permission of the department to take some of the program-related courses. Audition then next year and you'll be much better prepared.

(those pieces above represent my second year audition, not the one I wasn't totally ready for)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
mol in swedish means minor and dur means major
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#18
Quote by R.Christie
Which Bouree? The one in Emin from first Lute suite is a good choice for exactly the (good) reasons you give. He wrote many bourees though, they are dances in two four that start on the second half of the second beat.
But do yourself a favor and borrow a classical guitar for a month.


Yep. Emin. I'm going to see if i can find a classical guitar this weekend.

Quote by axemanchris
No idea what I played now.... that was....19 years ago. (holy crap...)

It would be something like this, though:
John Dowland - Allemande (My Lady Hunsdon's Puffe) - Gr. 8
Villa Lobos Etude #1 or #3?? - gr. 9
Fernando Sor - Theme and Variations of Mozart's Magic Flute - Gr. 10

....I know I did the Dowland. There might have been one of the more difficult Sor studies in there too (or instead), but that list is at least comparable to what I would have played.

Ten days, though.... even if you're a real hot-shot player, don't even try to learn one of those pieces in ten days. For serious.

You might have to do what I did and audition well enough to show that you're serious, but not well enough to get in. At least you'll get permission of the department to take some of the program-related courses. Audition then next year and you'll be much better prepared.

(those pieces above represent my second year audition, not the one I wasn't totally ready for)

CT



It's not a performance major so I don't think there going to be too strict, although my mindset until then is going to be that they are complete stiffs, and look for everything.
What it is, is a bachelor of arts. He was impressed when i said i was a guitarist that new intervals, which makes me question the school, but everyone i've talked to say its an amazing music department.

And if i dont get in this time it wont affect me to much because i would start next semester which is the second semester so some of the first semester classes wont be offered, i'll be able to test into theory so i guess either way i'll be fine.
Quote by joshjhasarrived
Little does the government suspect that it's funds are being rapidly drained through funding infinite free cardboard boxes to bored teenagers on an internet forum.
Last edited by victoryaloy at Nov 6, 2008,