#1
Ok. I have an epiphone acoustic. Not sure wich one. It cost like $250. My parents got it fo christmas.

When im tuned standard, sometimes ill get fret buzz on e string, but barely. If i play drop D or drop c, my low e string buzzes so frikken much. I tried new strings, but it didnt fix it, now my strings are about 2 weeks old, and it buzzes SOOOOOOOOOO much.

I don't know much about guitars and action and intonation and all that stuff.

Could someone explain my problem, and how to fix it?

Thanks
#4
perhaps for drop tunings... you need to get a heavier gauge string......
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#5
I have d'addario lights. Theres extra light, light, and medium ones. The dude said I shouldn't get the mediums, because my neck couldn't handle it?

Also, If im in drop c, and I just tune the low e a step up, so its even with the rest, would it just be the same as standard just lower? Because i don't want to have to switch strings for tunings.

So if i have heavy ones and im in drop c, i can just tune the low e up to normal, but with a capo on second fret, then every thing would be like normal just lower??? then i could just put a capo on for stuff in standard tuning?

Sorry im kinda a noob
#7
On which frets is it buzzing the most?

Since it might be 2 causes: your neck relief or your saddle, depending on where it's buzzing.

Neck relief is fixed by loosening the truss rood no more than a quarter turn. For the saddle, i can't really think of any solutions than to put a shim underneath it OR get a new, higher one.
#10
ignore the person who said you need a higher gauge string(s) for drop tunings.

take it into a shop and get it fixed. its fret buzz. thats your problem, not the gauge strings you have.
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#11
Quote by nathanlamb
Ok. I have an epiphone acoustic. Not sure wich one. It cost like $250. My parents got it fo christmas.

When im tuned standard, sometimes ill get fret buzz on e string, but barely. If i play drop D or drop c, my low e string buzzes so frikken much. I tried new strings, but it didnt fix it, now my strings are about 2 weeks old, and it buzzes SOOOOOOOOOO much.

I don't know much about guitars and action and intonation and all that stuff.

Could someone explain my problem, and how to fix it?

Thanks


Did it always do it?

Reason I ask is. If not, then it may be that the the nut slot for your low E has worn down.

Wear on the nut will cause buzzing, and the effect it has of lowering the action, will also cause buzzing.

If you do lots of drop tuning, then you are tuning down, then up etc all the time, which will "file" down a cheap plastic nut (possibly hollow) very quickly.

Check your nut for wear. Get a nice Bone nut put on.
#12
Was it ever taken in for a set up after you got it home??
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#13
no it wasnt set up. I got it for christmas last year, my parents knew nothing bout buying haha. I jus started playing it 6 months ago. Yes its always been like this. It doesn't buzz when i strum extremely soft tho.
#14
I don't necessarily agree with the statement that detuning should not cause the buzz...it depends on a couple things.

First of all, if the guitar was never set up for the strings/gauge you like to use, then any buzz or lack thereof is a matter of luck. The fact that it plays fine in standard but buzzes in dropped tunings tells me that the neck may lack the correct amount of 'relief', or slight upward arch. When you reduce the tension on the neck by dropping the tuning down, the neck relaxes and becomes too flat, resulting in fret buzz. Heavier strings alone may correct this, but its a shot in the dark.

There are SO many variables that can cause this; neck relief, twist, depth of the nut slots, a high fret here and there, a saddle that's been shaved too low for action. All these work in concert to produce either clean playing or buzz and intonation issues.

You need to determine the EXACT cause(es). You could take it to a qualified tech (NOT one of the salesmen at Guitar Center or wherever). Decide on what your preferred strings will be (esp. as to gauge) and have the neck adjusted accordingly, fret level, nut slot depth and saddle height checked, maybe a fret level/crown/polish into the bargain...OR...

...it's a $250 guitar. Its very likely that simply stringing heavier will correct this, but you shouldn't feel scared to experiment with adjusting the neck yourself, using a straight-edge to check fret level, etc. Go online and look up methods of checking the depth of nut slots... TRY a couple things. If you screw it up, it probably won't be permanent, and you will at least have learned something. You won't be out all that much, and when you're ready for a really sweet upscale axe, you'll really be ready for it.

Good Luck!
#15
Quote by maxtheaxe
I don't necessarily agree with the statement that detuning should not cause the buzz...it depends on a couple things.

First of all, if the guitar was never set up for the strings/gauge you like to use, then any buzz or lack thereof is a matter of luck. The fact that it plays fine in standard but buzzes in dropped tunings tells me that the neck may lack the correct amount of 'relief', or slight upward arch. When you reduce the tension on the neck by dropping the tuning down, the neck relaxes and becomes too flat, resulting in fret buzz. Heavier strings alone may correct this, but its a shot in the dark.

There are SO many variables that can cause this; neck relief, twist, depth of the nut slots, a high fret here and there, a saddle that's been shaved too low for action. All these work in concert to produce either clean playing or buzz and intonation issues.

You need to determine the EXACT cause(es). You could take it to a qualified tech (NOT one of the salesmen at Guitar Center or wherever). Decide on what your preferred strings will be (esp. as to gauge) and have the neck adjusted accordingly, fret level, nut slot depth and saddle height checked, maybe a fret level/crown/polish into the bargain...OR...

...it's a $250 guitar. Its very likely that simply stringing heavier will correct this, but you shouldn't feel scared to experiment with adjusting the neck yourself, using a straight-edge to check fret level, etc. Go online and look up methods of checking the depth of nut slots... TRY a couple things. If you screw it up, it probably won't be permanent, and you will at least have learned something. You won't be out all that much, and when you're ready for a really sweet upscale axe, you'll really be ready for it.

Good Luck!


What is a good cheap tech guy then?
#16
Quote by nathanlamb
What is a good cheap tech guy then?


Mutually exclusive dude.

There are Good expensive ones and good reasonable ones, but no good cheap ones.

Check you local Yellow Pages etc for luthiers, or ask at your local PROPER guitar shop or music shop, who they would use for repairs etc.

Your probably looking at $100 minimum for a setup, maybe with a nut thrown in, fret levelling etc, depending on what is needed.