#1
Okay I've been playing since I joined UG (last Apr) and I consider myself pretty good for a begginer. I play songs like "Back in Black", "In Bloom", and "Black Dog" (can't play the solos for Back in Black or Black Dog, just everything else) and I'm learning music theory, working on some blues, and I was wondering about solos. I mean, I can play only slow solos at best (like Santana) and I was wondering how I could start playing them. I mean Its not like I could just try until I get it, I can't even begin to play solos. Help?
Black then white are all I see,
in my infancy, red and yellow then came to be.
#2
I would start by learning the 5 different positions of the minor pentatonics that is what those solos are mostly based on. Then move to major and minor scales as well.
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#3
one word.............PRACTICE
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#4
Quote by saitenslayer
one word.............PRACTICE


yeah that, just play it over and over until you build up speed and can play it
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#5
play the fast solos real slow until it is in your muscle memory. then speed it up.
#6
Quote by Led man32
I would start by learning the 5 different positions of the minor pentatonics that is what those solos are mostly based on. Then move to major and minor scales as well.


I know...all of that.
Black then white are all I see,
in my infancy, red and yellow then came to be.
#7
Scale practice alone doesn't improve your confidence or soloing ability. What you need is some way to apply scale knowledge practically.

I sometimes practice improvising solos by turning on the radio and jamming with whatever song comes on next.

There are a number of advantages to this:
Half the time you will not have heard the song before, soooo;
- you will learn how to pick what key you have to solo in
- you will learn how to solo in different keys
- you will learn how to solo in different timings
- you will learn how to solo in different genres
- you will learn songs along the way
- you will learn when you should play, and shouldn't
- you will make up little licks that you'll continue to play and explore as you play into the future
- it's fun! and random!

Eventually you should get to the point where you can hear it, even play chords along with songs you've never heard before.

What's the point of this you ask? Because this is what you'll do with a band.

Oh, and stick away from the Classical Music stations; key changes mess with your head
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
Quote by saitenslayer
one word.............PRACTICE


Practice what? People love to ****ing throw that word around but I don't even think they know what it means. This is about as helpfull as being stabbed.
Black then white are all I see,
in my infancy, red and yellow then came to be.
#9
Most solos are improvised and few are ever played the same way twice. First thing you need to determine, is the song in a minor or major key. That factor will determine, largely, which scale you play for your solo. Become familiar with the pentatonic major, pentatonic minor and major scales. Penta means 5 and tonic means tone. The straight up major scale uses all 7 notes. If we were in the key of C, it would have C, D, E, F, G, A, B and C. If a song is in a major key, most likely, a major scale will work quite well. If a song is in a minor key, chances are pretty good that a minor scale, such as pentatonic minor will work great. How do we find the key of a song? An easy way for beginners to find it, is to play each note up the neck of the guitar on one string as the song is playing. Listen for the drone note, or the note that sounds like it fits in the song. There may be more than one, but one of them will really stand out. Once you've found that note, now you need to find out if the song is major or minor. I won't list the notes/fingerings here, but play the major and minor scales in the key you determined the song to be in. One of them should sound good and the other may be a little dissonant. Now it's just a matter of learning your phrasing, or how to arrange the notes in your solo so they sound good - and combining bends, hammer ons, pull offs, slides and other tricks to make it sound sweet. One last thing. You may hear someone mention relative minor, or natural minor. They're the same thing. I'll probably confuse the heck out of you, but if a song is, say, in the key of C major, we can play Am pentatonic and it should sound good. The relative minor (pentatonic) uses the same notes as the major scale its taken from. It's just that the scale starts at a different place (A vs C). Relative minor is built from the 6th degree interval. If you're studying theory, that might sound familiar. Good luck!!!
#10
listen to AlanHB... this is a huge help. plus it is actually fun

also try writing your own song and recording it and then improvise over it
helps improvising and you will probably figure out a few riffs to add to your song this way
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