#1
Okay, I am by far no expert but feel I would give my two cents in what you should consider for starting to do shows with your band.

Bar gigs/pub:
My band does alot of these atm (every weekend on average, last weekend had 2)

-Younger groups might have a harder time getting a gig because the owners may feel maturity isnt up to par with dealing with the drunks and so on. It also plays a role when schedualing with them cause they might get the impression someone could throw a tentrum tantrum if they don't get the dates or as many shows they want...

My tip: It isn't impossible to get a gig in these joints. But having someone in your band who drinks out alot at these places and are good friends with owners is a perk. My singer does karaoke and has become high in demand and so hes pretty good friends with the people at the bars we play at. Summary: Act mature for your age and become friends at first if you can. Talent is one thing, but professionalism is also important


Parties: Best way to start out in my opinion. Most people are looking for live entertainment because it usually ups the cool factor of their get together. Suitable for all ages and if you want to move to bars for shows - go in and suggest they come to so and so party or check you out if possible.


How to go about getting a gig....:
Being reasonable and patient are big keys to this. Places that usually book alot of bands or events can be booked months ahead of time so if you approach them hoping for a gig right away don't expect much... It is just how things are done, take what you can get and try to find other places... This gives you time also to prepare for when you do play at the place because you will know how long you have and can fine tune song doubts you may have.

When going for a bar gig or a party, some places might want a demo or to hear you play live. Giving them a list of upcoming shows can be a good idea for this because it lets them know you play already at places so aren't entirely knew to gigging. and gives them a chance to hear your live sound because a well done demo can mislead places.

If a demo can't be recorded, offer to give a private set to the place of maybe 2-3 songs so they can see how you are. If the bar is willing, have them let other bar owners join in the private show so you can save time with and get a large crowd aware of you at once.

Again - patience is everything, it can take awhile to get going but when you do get going it will take off if you do things well.

Pricing:
People sometimes try to get too much for their band when they first play, which can cause them to lose more gigs then not. A general rule of thumb is for first few shows - go cheap or free. You want to expand your fanbase/audience and more people know about you, more business you will bring in to the joint. From here on out you can slowly raise price based on skill and demand, but don't get too greedy.

General rule of thumb (U.S. Dollars)
First show - free
Second to fourth show - 15 a member(original band), 25-35(cover band)
Fifth show on - 25-? a member(original), 75-120(cover)

I don't know good pay amounts for original bands because I play in 95% cover one, but many factors come into consideration... if tis for an hour or two.. 50-80 bucks to split is a good amount to start at... My band has just done our 42nd gig since we started last year and are currently at 500 a show (110 a member, 60 for parttime member) but we also do 4.5 hour shows... Be reasonable to what you think you deserve and what the place can afford.

A side note - Holidays and big events are the best time to really raise the price.. my band played for a local festival and the 4th of july and jacked total band cost to 800 cause of the demand for music groups during these times.... in our area 800 is more then most gigs but also far less then festivals so we got snatched fast... price competitively also... you arent the only one trying to get shows

Quote by axemanchris
The cardinal rule: Remember that they have to be convinced that they will make money. If you can convince them of that, yer in.

CT



In conclusion being patient and reasonable are the key factors here.... I don't know the music business like some huge label but from what I have witnessed in my area this is how things look a little. I hope this helps anyone....
Last edited by ehlert99 at Nov 7, 2008,
#4
A good idea for us young whippersnappers is to ask for drinks/drinks tokens as payment for the first few gigs in a certain bar.
Once you start to pull a good sized crowd (read: good sized, not just your friends) then start to talk about cash.
#5
im not sure about the 15/25-35 per member on your second gig, that seems a bit steep..
other than that though it was a good read
Who decided that pie would be sold on Tuesday but not Wednesday?
#6
Well I dont know when people start charging, I got paid my 3rd gig and it was about 65 bucks so I dont know a good rule, if people give me enough good suggestions for prices I will change.

Drink tokens are a good idea, but most bands usually negotiate those in with the payment. Either way unless your 21 or legal to drink you probably wont get it unless they dont mind giving free sodie pop.
#7
The cardinal rule: Remember that they have to be convinced that they will make money. If you can convince them of that, yer in.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Good stuff thanks for gathering your experience and sharing this. It would be nice to add even more types of venues to this if at all possible, and the payment amounts listed seem pretty arbitrary to me, though the general idea of starting off cheap/free and working up is fine.
#10
Quote by ehlert99
Quoted in first post!


haha... thanks!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
Well I am open to input, pm or put on here and I will put it in first post with credit to you if people agree on it.
#12
Good list...my band is all 16 year olds, but we've all been playing almost 7 years, and each take it extremely seriously. It's tough to get out there and convince places that you're mature, and not the stereotypical young band, you know?
"This is The End, beautiful friend, The End"
#13
Wow I forgot about this :P yea I know I am 19 and wouldn't be anywhere if I didnt have a karaoke guy in my band whos done it a long time and is well respected hes basically the reason I get shows.