#1
I noticed the one thing from holding me back from being a really good guitarist, (even though I think I'm okay), is my runs.

I don't have a problem playing and technique, but I feel like I'm in a rut when it comes to runs. I don't know what it is, even simple sixteenth legato runs feels like they are choppy and staccato and lacking clarity and tone, even to the point of falling behind beat. I can't figure it out.

Does anyone have any exercises to help me with this problem? I really want to figure it out so I can be a better guitarist. Some examples are Sweet Child O' Mine, and the beginning of the Stairway to Heaven solos. It's like my two hands aren't forming a bond, they are just trying to do their own thing separately instead of working together to create something awesome.

Any exercises/advices would be welcome. Thank you!
-->Chris D.<--

that's like saying you might wanna try out this guitar but I just wanna warn you the action blows and it sounds like a bunch morons trying to screw a door knob


#2
For practicing legato, I think the most important thing is to relax. Get to the point where you can run those legato licks up and down the neck without feeling a thing. Even if you have to play at quarter (or slower) speed.

Paul Gilbert has some pretty good legato exercises on youtube as well.
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#3
Thanks, I'm looking those up now.

Btw, is holding your pick perpendicular to the ground a bad idea? I noticed that if I angle it slightly (like most speedpickers) I get faster results without much loss in tone...I'm more of a SRV-picking style, big and bluesy. I dunno if I need to kind of adapt, or what though...
-->Chris D.<--

that's like saying you might wanna try out this guitar but I just wanna warn you the action blows and it sounds like a bunch morons trying to screw a door knob


#4
If it works for you, do it. The sound coming out is the most important part.

That said, concentrate less on your hands and more on your sound. Don't stare at your fretboard, rather focus on what's coming out of your amp. Eventually as you get used to it your hands will find the rhythm they need. It's ok to glance for orientation, but once you know where you are don't constantly look down to "make sure your shoes are tied while you run".

Hope that makes sense
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