#1
how do they sound so perfect? every band I've seen live sounds completly perfect. I know it comes from practice but they don't even seem to accidently hit other strings and the other strings don't vibrate . How is this possible? sorry if i seem hard to understand
#2
well they probably do screw up, but if they are like me - they catch it before you hit the whole chord or the note rings too long..... Equipment helps too, I use a crate amp and it sounds amazing through my schecter and les paul. most guitarists mute the other strings with their spare fingers or palm when the yget the spare parts for it
#3
Practice, and knowing not to let the audience know when you make a mistake.
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#4
We razz these "false metal" and "pop-punk" bands for lack of ability, but music is their full time job. Imagine how good you would get at a song if you practiced 9-5, 5 days every week. The 40-hour work week is usually only for less high paying jobs. A physician may work 65 hours, and residents work 100+ hours with frequency. When they're recording or performing, even these "lesser bands" work at least 40 hours/week, if not 60 to 80. When they do screw up, though, they know how to mask it. An important skill to acquire is the ability to move past a mistake; you WILL screw up, but if you're sneaky, only you and your band will notice; if the audience doesn't hear the screw-up, you're not screwed.
#5
But sometimes when I do a bend i accidently just touch another string it rings out. I have never seen this live and i pay special attention. Is there any way i can remedy this? heavier gauge strings?
#6
live bands screw up all the time but you wont notice it as much because there is so much more volume that they can mute it and some other sound will fill it
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Quote by Punkismygod
U sure u want a floydrose? those things will make your nerves explode
#7
but they don't even seem to accidently hit other strings and the other strings don't vibrate . How is this possible?


Basic muting ability?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by d3mon slay
But sometimes when I do a bend i accidently just touch another string it rings out. I have never seen this live and i pay special attention. Is there any way i can remedy this? heavier gauge strings?


use another finger to mute strings above say bend with ur 2nd and 3rd if you reinforce it and use ur first to lay on the others to mute them
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Quote by Punkismygod
U sure u want a floydrose? those things will make your nerves explode
#9
that just comes with practice, but idk if youd notice if someone did that...remember a full band is playing...like the other guy said its their full time job, recording a cd they prob do a shitload of takes just for one solo, so its becomes so second nature to them...think of how good ud be playing that much
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#10
Live artists do screw up, even the most amazing guitarists do, I still notice the 6 mistakes in Cliffs of Dover - Eric Johnson, when he plays it live at austin city limits. The thing is he doesn`t let you know, he just keeps playing and makes up for it. I noticed these mistakes only after watching a shitload of times. What you shouldn`t do is make faces or anything, like John Petrucci did in the solo of Solitary Shell in the Live at Budokan DVD.
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#12
1.They practiced long and well enough so its easy to flawlessly play their songs.
2. They have a noise gate
#13
^ +1

. no matter how good you are, if you have your amp set to 11 with maxed out gain/distortion, there is going to be a little string noise here and there but a noise gate can cover most of that up without killing your tone or sound.
#14
Quote by d3mon slay
how do they sound so perfect? every band I've seen live sounds completly perfect. I know it comes from practice but they don't even seem to accidently hit other strings and the other strings don't vibrate . How is this possible? sorry if i seem hard to understand


They are in most cases experienced & accomplished musicians. They can do it live, because they can do it period.

That being said, they are human and do make mistakes. I've seen very accomplished musicians make mistakes live. It happens.
shred is gaudy music
#16
Quote by nemjeff13
that just comes with practice, but idk if youd notice if someone did that...remember a full band is playing...like the other guy said its their full time job, recording a cd they prob do a shitload of takes just for one solo, so its becomes so second nature to them...think of how good ud be playing that much


its second nature if you play that much.

they just practiced so much that they can play effortlessly with out messing up.

practice with a metranome...it helps a lot guys
.
#17
they have other instruments playing at the same time real loud.
unless they all **** up at the same time you will hardly be able to tell.
#18
Because there's a difference in Technical perfect and vibe. Music has no written rules and if it vibes good you won't notice the mistakes. Since this is what u feel.

Unless u go to a concert, stay totally sober with ur eyes closed next to the guitar amp, you won't notice it.

I Mean if u play all random notes, but hit that bend at the last note with a nice cymbal splash, a bass thumb and an epic 80's scream. U won't notice.

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#19
Quote by bangoodcharlote
We razz these "false metal" and "pop-punk" bands for lack of ability, but music is their full time job. Imagine how good you would get at a song if you practiced 9-5, 5 days every week. The 40-hour work week is usually only for less high paying jobs. A physician may work 65 hours, and residents work 100+ hours with frequency. When they're recording or performing, even these "lesser bands" work at least 40 hours/week, if not 60 to 80. When they do screw up, though, they know how to mask it. An important skill to acquire is the ability to move past a mistake; you WILL screw up, but if you're sneaky, only you and your band will notice; if the audience doesn't hear the screw-up, you're not screwed.

More than on average 14 hours a day if they worked 7 days a week? Or more than 20 if they have weekends off? Damn.
#20
Quote by 12345abcd3
More than on average 14 hours a day if they worked 7 days a week? Or more than 20 if they have weekends off? Damn.
Being on call is considered part of that. If you're on call, you may be able to sleep through the entire night, but you will most likely get 3ish hours of sleep in short segments, spending the rest of the night trying to save patients who are flatlining. You could also be up the entire night and have to work the next day, too, after working the previous day as well.

Residents are not supposed to work more than 80 hours, but that rule is just torn to shreds. There are rules about how many consecutive hours they can work, and I believe they are not permitted to work more than 28 consecutive hours; that rule is generally followed.

Residents work their asses off. It's really funny to hear people complain about how hard organic chemistry is (I'm part of that), but then all of us premeds get to go work even harder in med school. Then after med school, we get to work 100 hours/week.

Why the hell can't I just go into law?!?!
#21
I can't remember where I read this but

An amateur musician practices until they can play it right,
A professional musician practices until they can't play it wrong.
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Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

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#22
Practise.
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Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#23
Quote by Ænimus Prime
I can't remember where I read this but

An amateur musician practices until they can play it right,
A professional musician practices until they can't play it wrong.
That's part of a Chevrolet commercial aired during football games. You're probably not watching our crazy little sport, though.
#24
Well, that really cheapens the whole thing dunnit?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums