#1
Hey Guys!

I've got all my gear together and now the only thing I need next is a descent microphone to record my riffs.
I have a Shure SM58 with wich I record now but I reckon I could get a much better sound with a real recording mic.

I don't have a lot of cash left 'cause I just invested in a Peavey 6505.

I mainly play metal and hardcore (this is my band www.myspace.com/antiiconmetal)
and my gear is this:

Peavey 6505 head
Marshall 1960 A cab
LTD MH-400NT (w/ EMG's)
Boss Noise Suppressor NS-2

So what would be the best (medium budget) mic I should use to record my riffs.

By the way, I use a freeware recording program (Audacity), and I was wondering if there were any low/medium budget programs I should look into to have a better result?
thx alot guys!

Rien, Belgium (Europe)
#2
Hey asshole....

quit multi posting...

be god damn patient
Total Failure

If every dream is a wish, then to dream of zombies is to wish for an appetite without responsibility
#4
Well, the program itself doesn't do muhc difference.

What do you use in terms of soundcard/audio interface? A good microphone isn't gonna do any good if you just plug it into an integrated soundcard. Luckily decent mic pre-amps don't cost too much these days, so no worries there if you ain't got one.

But as for microphones, you should be good using either a Shure SM57 (Pretty much standard for amp miking) or a decent condenser microphone. Or both, but as beginner you might find things easier to start out with just one mic. A condenser mic can get you more natural sound of what you're hearing when you play your rig, but most players love the bright and clear sound you get with a 57.

It's not what you have, rather than how you use it. But a 57 stuck in front of the cabinet should be a fairly decent advise for a start. But I encourage to try and experiment. Miking an amp is not something with strict rules, we each have our preferences.
#5
Quote by Kriptonite_r
Sorry dude, just didn't know where to put this one, i'll delete the rest...



I dont mean to be a jerk... but you have been here for 2 years.. I figured you would know the rules by now
Total Failure

If every dream is a wish, then to dream of zombies is to wish for an appetite without responsibility
#6
Quote by Slovak_Ghost
I dont mean to be a jerk... but you have been here for 2 years.. I figured you would know the rules by now


well, i'm subscribed for two years but I'm rarely online. I've got a GuitarShop near me and for most of my questions I go there.
But when it comes to buying stuff I like to discuss my options here fist.
The GuitarShop itself doesn't seel mic's or software to record but the store next to it does. Problem is they don't care about your preferences and they want to sell you the most expensive stuff...

So yeah, I'm not really up to date with the rules. Not that I don't mind you telling me, I just don't think it had to be that way of telling it. Then again I do understand that when your on this forum alot and people do multipost often I would be pissed as well.

Are we good?
#7
Quote by Keskimaki
Well, the program itself doesn't do muhc difference.

What do you use in terms of soundcard/audio interface? A good microphone isn't gonna do any good if you just plug it into an integrated soundcard. Luckily decent mic pre-amps don't cost too much these days, so no worries there if you ain't got one.

But as for microphones, you should be good using either a Shure SM57 (Pretty much standard for amp miking) or a decent condenser microphone. Or both, but as beginner you might find things easier to start out with just one mic. A condenser mic can get you more natural sound of what you're hearing when you play your rig, but most players love the bright and clear sound you get with a 57.

It's not what you have, rather than how you use it. But a 57 stuck in front of the cabinet should be a fairly decent advise for a start. But I encourage to try and experiment. Miking an amp is not something with strict rules, we each have our preferences.


Thx for the info! I just started recording stuff so I don't always get wa you mean, but it's all stuff I can look up. I just plug my Shure SM58 in the line-in input of my laptop. I know that's probably not the best thing to do, but at the moment I don't have alot of alternatives. So what's a good starter's set-up? A Shure SM57 wich leads to a mic Pre-amp and then connect with my laptop?
And how to set up the mic...against my cabinet? Or like 1 meter away?
thx already!

Rien
#8
You don't need a new mic, you need a pre-amp. I promise you it will make your sound oh so much better.
#9
Quote by Kriptonite_r
A Shure SM57 wich leads to a mic Pre-amp and then connect with my laptop?


Yes. But I think you're fine off with that SM58. It's a pretty good general use microphone. And it's a dynamic (as is 57), so you don't necessarily need a pre-amp with phantom power, which is needed for a condenser mic. If you plan on doing lot of recording in the future I'd still recommend pre-amp with 2 inputs, with phantom power. You can then expand in the future, recording with two mics at the same time (getting a near mic and room mic sound at the same time, for example).

Quote by Kriptonite_r
And how to set up the mic...against my cabinet? Or like 1 meter away?
thx already!


Depends how much air you want in to the sound. But I'd say 1 meter is pretty far. I'd say something like 25-30 centimeters if you want space in to the sound. For tight sound stick it straight against the cabinet. Try different angles too until you find a sound you like.

But I really have to confess I'm not really an expert with miking amps.
Last edited by Keskimaki at Nov 6, 2008,
#10
Quote by Kriptonite_r
Hey Guys!

I've got all my gear together and now the only thing I need next is a descent microphone to record my riffs.
I have a Shure SM58 with wich I record now but I reckon I could get a much better sound with a real recording mic.


Actually the 58 is a nice mic and is a "real" mic. It's industry standard and works well for a lot of different setups. If you have a quiet space you may want a condenser mic for that different type of sound...

Quote by Kriptonite_r
I don't have a lot of cash left 'cause I just invested in a Peavey 6505.

I mainly play metal and hardcore (this is my band www.myspace.com/antiiconmetal)
and my gear is this:

Peavey 6505 head
Marshall 1960 A cab
LTD MH-400NT (w/ EMG's)
Boss Noise Suppressor NS-2

So what would be the best (medium budget) mic I should use to record my riffs.

By the way, I use a freeware recording program (Audacity), and I was wondering if there were any low/medium budget programs I should look into to have a better result?
thx alot guys!

Rien, Belgium (Europe)


You should be fine with the 58 but I suggest investing $200 for an audio interface. Sure you could run into a stock sound card with a preamp but you will still have poor quality and latency. An interface benefits you in many ways and is worth the price.

Audacity is fine to start out on but if you want to get more into music you may want a sequencer better suited to recording and such. Cakewalk makes a lot of Sonar software which are reasonable in price.
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/navigation?q=Sonar&st=

I run Producer 7 however the lower end versions are quite nice.


Lastly, see my sig for links to my UG recording videos and Tweak's Guide.
Last edited by moody07747 at Nov 6, 2008,
#11
You don't need a new mic. Hundreds of records have been recorded with either an SM58 or 57(which is just a 58 with a different grill).
What you need is audio interface if you want to record straight to your computer. The most common type is a USB interface that plugs right into the USB port on your laptop or desktop, but if you have firewire then I would suggest a Firewire interface.

If you don't necessarily want to record to your computer than you could get a multi-track recorder and mic preamp, or you could wait to get the preamp because most digital multi-tracks have built in preamps that sound just as good as a $50 to $100 external preamp.

That's really all you need to get a nice sounding home recording, but if you're recording acoustic guitar or other quiet instruments then I would opt for a nice condensor microphone. If you're recording guitar cabs and vocals then your SM58 is more than sufficient.

www.myspace.com/372894189

everything I've recorded has been with either a 57 or MXL991 straight into my Boss multitrack.