#3
Come on, man. There are only three notes in the harmonica's part.

G D# F# over and over and over.

The violins in the background make a melody with the same three notes and occasionally D instead of D#.
#4
Quote by Withakay
Come on, man. There are only three notes in the harmonica's part.

G D# F# over and over and over.
You do realise playing that on a C harmonica is extremely difficult? You'd need to use overblows, which is very difficult.

I think the song is played with a chromatic harmonica. To me, it has that sort of nasally tone a chromatic harmonica has.
#5
Quote by demonofthenight
You do realise playing that on a C harmonica is extremely difficult?
I didn't, but then we can transpose them.

What do these 5 and 4 notes stand for anyway?
#6
^^Hole numbers. Standard diatonic harmonicas have ten holes, and those numbers are up above the holes for conveniance. Generally on a harmonica tab, 5 means blow, and -5 means draw