#1
Recently I ran across a topic on here that someone posted about speed, and the person said he saw an instructional dvd in which the instructor said that after you played a note with the index finger move it to the next note that that finger would be playing...


So I guess if I was playing Iolan scale on the A string it'd be E string 5 7 9 and then A string 5 7 9.... so after I got done fretting the 5th fret on the E string I'd shift my index finger to the A string 5th fret while my second finger played the 7th fret on the E string.

That seems ridiculously confusing and I havent ever seen any guitarist do anything like that. I'm wondering if I (and perhaps the person that made the topic orginally) misunderstood what the guy was saying?

Because I wouldn't move my first finger to the A string until after I fretted the 9th fret on the E string.

Hopefully I explained my question well enough. Thanks for any responses!
#2
it can be right
its used for speed when youre playing really fast
think of it as preparing your other fingers for the other frets in the scale
and it can be used for better coordination training,expriment with it a little its actually fun
#3
Quote by syn7
it can be right
its used for speed when youre playing really fast
think of it as preparing your other fingers for the other frets in the scale
and it can be used for better coordination training,expriment with it a little its actually fun



Well thats interesting I guess, when I see shredders on youtube it doesn't seem like they do this type of thing though and it also seems like it'd be pretty weird to get used to. Is this technic mainly used for shredding then?
#4
i dont know exactly,but my teacher showed me this excercise to improve my coordination,and i too didnt see much sense in it when i was starting to play it but as you play it starts to make more sense...
i guess when you would shred you wouldnt move all your fingers when youre done playing with the on one string,just your first finger cause the other would be blocking the note you would want to play with your first finger
#5
Ah,

well I guess is my question is, since I can't shred (yet) do I even need to worry about that right now? It'd certainly make me have to almost relearn every solo I do know.... (in that I'd be trying to figure out where my index finger should crawl to next instead of just going there when its time)
#6
no no you shouldnt change your technique,far from that,i would use this when you just play scales for a "quicker" switch of your finger or something like that
i wouldnt use this for a "rock type" solos,just for solos with many scales in them
i hope you got it
im not american so i dont know how to explain you this differently
#7
Heh, Thanks. I just tried this with some modes and it was pretty frustrating, I'm really not sold on it yet though I guess it could help if you are going ridiculously fast...

Hmmm
#8
its kinda one of those "tricks" it can help you get maybe a little bit faster but i wouldnt know the differnce beacause even if some shredders use this technique you couldnt possibly see that cause it goes really fast,
its frustrating but it can actually be mastered really fast,just do it really slow,and when you get it you will greatly improve your finger coordination
oh and,this technique is also cool when you go down from the high e string to the low e with scales,try
#9
Hm, Ok.

Well I'd be interested in seeing if this is commonly used or if people get by without it. More input would be great. Although either way it probably wouldn't be something I'd be using for awhile. I can't shred, haven't even tried to yet
#10
I doubt it commonly used by most guitarists but it sounds like it would help with left hand speed alot if you could keep it constantly moving. Most people just switch straight to fretting the note rather than preparing for it early though.
#11
Sounds a bit like playing scales and arpeggios on piano...where you move your thumb to wherever it's supposed to go right after you play a note with it.
#13
Quote by CupCake182
I doubt it commonly used by most guitarists but it sounds like it would help with left hand speed alot if you could keep it constantly moving. Most people just switch straight to fretting the note rather than preparing for it early though.



Thanks, thats what I'd hoped to hear. I can see the slight benefit of it but I noticed when I try and play scales fast I've almost got my index finger shifted slightly into its next position anyways.

So I think I'm not going to worry about it. Thanks again for the reply. And the others too... I don't know how to sweep pick now. Haven't tried to learn that yet. Since I'm teaching myself I figured that for those harder techniques I'd wait till I had a teacher or someone to physically show me. Rather than try and teach myself with the possability of learning incorrectly.
#14
Quote by Lumdiyen
Thanks, thats what I'd hoped to hear. I can see the slight benefit of it but I noticed when I try and play scales fast I've almost got my index finger shifted slightly into its next position anyways.

So I think I'm not going to worry about it. Thanks again for the reply. And the others too... I don't know how to sweep pick now. Haven't tried to learn that yet. Since I'm teaching myself I figured that for those harder techniques I'd wait till I had a teacher or someone to physically show me. Rather than try and teach myself with the possability of learning incorrectly.


it's not as hard as it sounds as long as you don't try to rush into it before you ready. I mean you have to be able to play that fast on a single string before you're going to be able to sweep pick. Just keep practicing
#15
Quote by gnrliesmanlies
it's not as hard as it sounds as long as you don't try to rush into it before you ready. I mean you have to be able to play that fast on a single string before you're going to be able to sweep pick. Just keep practicing



Yeah , I'm sure just like with anything if I practiced it, I'd get it. But since I'd be watching online lessons about it its easier to develop...not so good technique and since I don't really care that much about sweep picking right now anyways....

#16
I think you'll automatically start doing it when you start playing really fast solos and stuff, and play up to speed.
#17
Quote by Lumdiyen
Recently I ran across a topic on here that someone posted about speed, and the person said he saw an instructional dvd in which the instructor said that after you played a note with the index finger move it to the next note that that finger would be playing...


So I guess if I was playing Iolan scale on the A string it'd be E string 5 7 9 and then A string 5 7 9.... so after I got done fretting the 5th fret on the E string I'd shift my index finger to the A string 5th fret while my second finger played the 7th fret on the E string.

That seems ridiculously confusing and I havent ever seen any guitarist do anything like that. I'm wondering if I (and perhaps the person that made the topic orginally) misunderstood what the guy was saying?

Because I wouldn't move my first finger to the A string until after I fretted the 9th fret on the E string.

Hopefully I explained my question well enough. Thanks for any responses!


You are best to call it the Natural Minor scale, don't confuse the scale with Aeolian Mode (In fact forget everything anyone, including me ever mentioned about modes, until your into like your 3rd year of playing )

Yes the technique is correct, however you don't need to play your index finger on the 5th fret of A string "at the same time", as the 9th fret of Low E, just once you play the note move it up to the next string and continue at a steady pace. It will come to you eventually it just takes some practice.
Last edited by Helpy Helperton at Nov 7, 2008,
#18
Quote by Helpy Helperton
You are best to call it the Natural Minor scale, don't confuse the scale with Aeolian Mode (In fact forget everything anyone, including me ever mentioned about modes, until your into like your 3rd year of playing )

Yes the technique is correct, however you don't need to play your index finger on the 5th fret of A string "at the same time", as the 9th fret of Low E, just once you play the note move it up to the next string and continue at a steady pace. It will come to you eventually it just takes some practice.


Not sure what you're saying here. That once I played the 5th fret on the E string move my index over to the 5th fret on the A, or immediatly after I fretted the 9th fret on the A string move my index to the 5th fret A string?

Anyways, to me it does seem like this is something that (when possible) would come automatically. It doesn't seem to BE possible to every situation, like when you shift positions to higher frets you won't be able to even move your index finger till its time.

So to my knowledge this is pretty much something only useful it very limited situations. I don't know though.
#20
That is a very weird way to play and must be very premeditated, which doesn't blend well with improv licks. Maybe helps playing a certain fast solo in a song, but practicing at the "normal way" over and over can get it through either IMO.
Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

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