#1
Hi, I was just listening to Birdland by Jaco pastorius and i noticed he played some type of notes (people tell me its called an artificial harmonic) that sounded really nice. I saw a video of him doing it live and he was fretting the notes, but at the same time somehow mutting and playing it making a harmonic sound.... I was wondering if anyone knows how to do this or knows if this has any resemblence to a pinch harmonic on guitar...
#2
Isn't that just a normal harmonic?
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#3
Pinch harmonics are a form of artificial harmonic. An artificial harmonic is one produced while fretting a note.
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#4
yeah pinch harmonics, just divides the string, puts his hand where he can get the correct harmonic, and it sounds an octave higher
#5
Quote by Taygunov
Hi, I was just listening to Birdland by Jaco pastorius and i noticed he played some type of notes (people tell me its called an artificial harmonic) that sounded really nice. I saw a video of him doing it live and he was fretting the notes, but at the same time somehow mutting and playing it making a harmonic sound.... I was wondering if anyone knows how to do this or knows if this has any resemblence to a pinch harmonic on guitar...


I had this exact question a few months ago and learned it within the week.

I play a Fender Jazz bass right now, so you might wanna look at a picture to find your finger placement.

So, he starts on the 15th fret of the G string, so just put your finger there as if you were gonna pluck it, next, place your thumb just ahead of the first (closest to the neck) pickup of the jazz bass (look up a picture if you're not using one), while keeping your thumb there, pluck the string. You'll know it when you get it. To play the entire intro, you'll have to move your thumb because having it in that constant position will mute out some notes (for example when he plays the third note of the intro on the 12th fret).
#6
Artificial harmonics adds a huge range to your bass

a good way to learn out they work is to think of the 12th fret harmonic being an open string artificial harmonic.

play it with a finger/thumb/something, from the right hand, whatever feels easiest, but right handed

then fret the first fret and , and move your harmonic placement to over the 13th fret and strike it how you did the 12th fret harmonic, do them to the edge of the fret boad on all strings. its good to learn this way to use the frets like training wheels

once you get them all cleanly in a row, try and fret higher notes with your left hand and find the artificial harmonic for them.
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#7
Isn't Birdland by Weather Report? That's one of my favorite Jazz songs.
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#8
^It's by Weather Report, yes. As for artificial harmonics it helps a lot to know about natural harmonics. It then makes more sense when you say that an artificial harmonic is just a natural harmonic you've moved up the neck by fretting a note and effectively making that note your nut.