#1
hey again everyone ! i appreciate everyones help with other posts and such,its been difficult playing guitar by ear with very little knowledge of theory on my part. It makes it harder to ask people who DO actually play with music theory because no one knows what the hell im taking about haha !

anyways heres my question....

E-
B-
G- 5 9
D- 3 7
A-
E-

So everyone ive asked has been telling me that these higher octave notes are played as power chords...there are only TWO notes in each power chord so which note would be the root note? would it just be the first note played like im guessing? im really just trying to figure out the root notes of these type of power chords so that i can determin the actual chord they are to apply to my own music and writing songs. also would anyone happen to have a chart where i can take a look through power chords played in this higher octave? i cant seem to find anything except the lower octave stuff like c5 g5 and so on...typical power chords... any help would be appreciated !

Anthony
#2
It really depends on the implied harmony in the practical application, as they are two note diads. However, it is highly likely they are simply being used as root 5th power chords in a playing context, where the first would be an F with a fifth above it and the second would be an A with a fifth above it.
#3
The notes on the D string in your example are the root notes. Power chords are made up of a root and a fifth, hence the term '5th chord.'

The first chord in your example has a root note onthe 3rd fret of the D string, an F. The other note of the power chord is the 5th fret of the G string, a C. The interval from F to C is called a major 5th. There;s your power chord .
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#4
Quote by philipp122
The notes on the D string in your example are the root notes. Power chords are made up of a root and a fifth, hence the term '5th chord.'

The first chord in your example has a root note onthe 3rd fret of the D string, an F. The other note of the power chord is the 5th fret of the G string, a C. The interval from F to C is called a major 5th. There;s your power chord .

Perfect fifth.
#6
Quote by kutupangelsx5
....

E-
B-
G- 5 9
D- 3 7
A-
E-

So everyone ive asked has been telling me that these higher octave notes are played as power chords...there are only TWO notes in each power chord so which note would be the root note? would it just be the first note played like im guessing? im really just trying to figure out the root notes of these type of power chords so that i can determin the actual chord they are to apply to my own music and writing songs. also would anyone happen to have a chart where i can take a look through power chords played in this higher octave? i cant seem to find anything except the lower octave stuff like c5 g5 and so on...typical power chords... any help would be appreciated !

Anthony


Well in your example, you have F5 and A5 - typical power chord shape.
One octave lower they would look like:

e
B
G
D
A 3 7
E 1 5

Usually the root note is the bass note i.e. the lowest tone. As others said in your example the F and A notes.

When you play these power chords in higher octave, the shape remains the same, except if you play note(s) on B string, which is only 4 semitones higher than G string (all others are 5 semitones apart )

example: F5

e
B
G
D 3 <-- root note one octave higher (F)
A 3 <-- 5th (C)
E 1 <-- root note (F)

one octave higher

e
B 6 <-- F
G 5 <-- C
D 3 <-- F
A
E

Hope this helps
Last edited by HiromiBodom at Nov 7, 2008,
#7
Quote by kutupangelsx5
hey again everyone ! i appreciate everyones help with other posts and such,its been difficult playing guitar by ear with very little knowledge of theory on my part. It makes it harder to ask people who DO actually play with music theory because no one knows what the hell im taking about haha !

anyways heres my question....

E-
B-
G- 5 9
D- 3 7
A-
E-

So everyone ive asked has been telling me that these higher octave notes are played as power chords...there are only TWO notes in each power chord so which note would be the root note? would it just be the first note played like im guessing? im really just trying to figure out the root notes of these type of power chords so that i can determin the actual chord they are to apply to my own music and writing songs. also would anyone happen to have a chart where i can take a look through power chords played in this higher octave? i cant seem to find anything except the lower octave stuff like c5 g5 and so on...typical power chords... any help would be appreciated !

Anthony


In order to figure this out for yourself, first you should figure out the notes that are being playing. So for this example: F and C, and A and E, respectively. Now.. since there are only two notes in this 'chord' (really what's called a dyad.. but that's not really important here) you pretty much know it's going to be a power chord.. which is a two-note 'chord' in which the notes are a perfect fifth apart. OK.. so now you're just looking for a perfect fifth interval, which can be made by starting from the lowest notes (or bass notes) of each of these 'chords'. The note in which you started from to create this P5 interval is the root note. If you don't understand intervals you should look into them if you want to understand naming other chords (with more than 2 notes). Hope that helps.
Nor less I deem that there are Powers
Which of themselves our minds impress;
That we can feed this mind of ours
In a wise passiveness.
--Wordsworth

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