#1
How will learning every note on the fretboard help me with learning scales? Im trying to figure that out, but when I look up scales, it looks like red dots everywhere, not like a tab. Once I learn all the notes on the fretboard, how will I be able to read the scale, cuz I dont see any notes written on it. Sorry , i'm trying to learn this online but it just looks like jibberish to me
#2
Learn stuff about key and how to construct scales using the note/alphabet way (cant think of its real name)

C major = C D E F G A B

so that once u learnt the fret board its all about placing the letters where designated
#3
you dont have to learn all of them persay, just up to the 12th fret then it starts all over again.
#4
Most of the stuff on the internet that you see with the red dots, is showing you the pattern of the scale on the neck of the guitar. Showing a scale this way is aimed at someone not familiar with music theory and the notes of the neck, in order for someone to pick up the basics of a scale and get playing right away.

Basically there are 3 ways of looking at learning scales:

Learn the notes on the fretboard - By learning the notes on the fretboard you can see exactly where most notes are right away, this is only really useful once applied to either of the 2 ways below. Knowing the notes is great but pretty useless on it's own. You need to combine this with either a scale pattern or interval structure for it to be really useful.

learning the pattern of the scale - this offers no help to the music theory side of things as you are not as aware of the notes you are playing. It is however useful when combined with intervals and knowing the notes on the fretboard.

Learning the intervals of the scale - By learning the intervals of the major scale, you are able to look at any scale and work out the notes using the major scale.

Knowing the notes on the fretboard is not a major advantage at first because in order for you to be able to build a scale you need to know about Intervals and the major scale. Unless you know (by reading somewhere or someone else telling you) which notes are supposed to be in the scale.

As you can probably tell I believe all 3 ways of learning scales are necessary, and all compliment each other.

Hope that helps at least a bit
Last edited by Helpy Helperton at Nov 7, 2008,
#5
Quote by El3ment380
How will learning every note on the fretboard help me with learning scales? Im trying to figure that out, but when I look up scales, it looks like red dots everywhere, not like a tab. Once I learn all the notes on the fretboard, how will I be able to read the scale, cuz I dont see any notes written on it. Sorry , i'm trying to learn this online but it just looks like jibberish to me

It helps in the same way learning the alphabet helps you learn words.

You don't learn scales from tabs or diagrams - you learn scales by learning the notes they contain and the pattern of intervals they follow. Have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns seciton.
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#6
The best way to go about learning the notes on the fretboard is, ironically, another application of theory. If you learn the intervals between the notes (or the steps, which may be easier) the whole process will become more visual.

For instance, let's take the C major scale.

The C Major scale has within it the notes C D E F G A B and C again.
Now. Each of these notes has a specific distance from the one proceeding and following it. Let's take C and D. Between the noted C and D we have what's called a major 2nd (also noted 2 half steps or one whole step).

Looking at the fretboard, we notice that C and D are two frets apart. This is because there is a note between them known as C sharp (or D flat as they are, for all intensive purposes, the same note). Thus we can conclude that each FRET (from fret 6 to 7, let's say) is a half step, since there are TWO half steps or a WHOLE step between C and D. The note between them being C sharp. This situation is the case for all natural notes (C D E F G A B) albeit two exception. There is only a half step between B and C (the 7th and 8th fret on your top string) and a half step between E and F (the open position and the first fret on your top string).

Understanding the concept of steps in theory will vastly ease your ability to comprehend the notes on a fretboard. Really, it honestly becomes something that's second nature after enough use.

Sorry if I've confused you! Let me know if you have any further questions.
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#7
So are you saying intervals, are like just a regular c major scale, but you can add notes within it?