#1
I've been recently trying to expand my understanding of the harmonic and melodic minor scales along with their respective modes.

Nearly everyone on this site has heard the term "phrygian dominant," and, as far as my comprehension will take me, this means simply the phrygian mode played in the key's harmonic minor (IE E phrygian dominant being played with G#'s instead of G naturals) Right so far?

So what would we call the other modes in harmonic minor? (Aeolian, Locrian, Ionian, Dorian, Lydian and Mixolydian) Are they called "dominant," too? Or do we refer to this as something else?

Thanks in advance.
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#2
http://www.globalbass.com/archives/oct2001/melodic_minor.htm
http://www.globalbass.com/archives/nov2001/modesharmminor.htm

The addition "Dominant" implies that the scale or chord has a Major 3rd and a Minor 7th degree in it. Just like the Dominant 7th chord.

I mean, if you were to say "Mixolydian Dominant", it wouldn't make much sense because the Mixolydian scale already has it's dominant features.
#3
Quote by one vision
The addition "Dominant" implies that the scale or chord has a Major 3rd and a Minor 7th degree in it. Just like the Dominant 7th chord.

This.

Anything described as a dominant scale implies that the scale outlines a dom7 chord (i.e. contains the notes 1 3 5 b7).

We assume all other notes are standard unless told otherwise.

The fifth mode of the harmonic minor outlines the dom7 chord and also includes the phrygian modal note (b2). Thus we name it Phrygian Dominant which describes it as including the notes 1 b2 3 5 b7 and all the other notes are assumed natural (4 6).

Similarly check out the Melodic Minor scale 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 (step pattern W H W W W W H)
If we go to the fourth mode W W W H W H W = 1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7.
This outlines the dom7 chord but with a sharp 4. So what do we call this one?? Well what mode does the #4 imply?? Yip that's right, we call it Lydian Dominant.

However take the third mode of the Melodic Minor scale.
The step pattern is W W W W H W H = 1 2 3 #4 #5 6 7.
This also contains the Lydian Modal note (#4) but has also the #5. The Lydian note with an Augmented fifth gives us the name Lydian Augmented.

Notice how two of the Melodic Minor modes are Lydian type modes. The names do not come from their place along the modal chart. They come from what notes are altered. Is there a modal note present? What other alterations are there especially to the fundamental chord tones 1 3 5 7.

I hope this made some sense.

EDIT: The Mixolydian Mode is sometimes referred to simply as the Dominant Mode.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Nov 7, 2008,
#4
Here are the names and formulas for each of the Harmonic and Melodic minor scales:

Harmonic Minor - R,2,b3,4,5,b6,7
Locrian natural 6 - R,b2,b3.4,b5,6,b7
Ionian Augmented - R,2,3,4,#5,6,7
Dorian #4 - R,2,b3,#4,5,6,b7
Phrygian Major - R,b2,3,4,5,b6,b7
Lydian #9 - R,#2,3,#4,5,6,7
Altered Diminshed - R,b2,b3,b4,b5,b6,bb7

I've heard the 5th mode of Harmonic Minor called Phrygian Dominant as well. In school I was taught Phrygian Major. Tomato-Tomato.

Meloic Minor - R,2,b3,4,5,6,7
Dorian b9 - R,b2,b3,4,5,6,b7
Lydian Augmented - R,2,3,#4,#5,6,7
Lydian Dominant - R,2,3,#4,5,6,b7
Mixolydian b6 - R,2,3,4,5,b6,b7
Locrian natural 2 - R,2,b3,4,b5,b6,b7
Super Locrian - R,b2,b3,b4,b5,b6,b7

Have fun.
#5
Quote by seth's daddy
I've heard the 5th mode of Harmonic Minor called Phrygian Dominant as well. In school I was taught Phrygian Major. Tomato-Tomato.
The scale has a ton of names, some more common or at least logical than others. For instance, I've heard it called "Gypsy Major," which makes no sense to me, though Phrygian Major makes sense, even if it isn't correct (by saying "major," you imply that the 6 and 7 are natural as well which is why we say "dominant").


TS, your question says to me that you lack a basic understanding of music theory and are too rapidly trying to jump into the more interesting, but more difficult material, kind of like someone trying to jump from 10th grade algebra to complex analysis without doing any trig, calculus, or real analysis in between. Please consult the theory lesson in my sig, the lessons in Freepower's sig, and the Crusade articles for basic concepts, and even some more advanced concepts.
#6
Quote by seth's daddy
Locrian natural 2 - R,2,b3,4,b5,b6,b7
I've seen this also called Locrian 2 (I've also seen it as Locrian #2 which is misleading for obvious reasons but this was in a theory book. An otherwise pretty reliable book too. Go figure.)
Quote by seth's daddy
Super Locrian - R,b2,b3,b4,b5,b6,b7
Also known as the Altered Scale because it is sometimes written as R b9 #9 3 b5 #5 b7 which as you can see outlines all the possible alterations b9 #9 b5 #5.

Just a note.
Si
#7
Tomato-Tomato
That really doesn't work in writing
My name is Andy
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#8
Believe it or not, I have a pretty solid understanding of basic theory, and I've been able to jump fairly well into neoclassical, jazz and blues. I've taken classes on the subject and been taught for several years. This subject, sadly, happened to be a hole in my lessons that I never got around to being taught.

Thanks a lot for the help guys.
My Rig:
Schecter 006 Diamond Series (Discontinued) Flat Black
Jackson JS30RR Metallic Blue
Line 6 Spider II 210
Boss TU-2
Sennheiser E835-S

Current Top 3:
Between the Buried and Me (Always)
The Faceless
Murder By Death