#1
I need to write the key signatures parallel majors and minors, I am completely lost. Could anyone give me some tips on relative minors and parallel minor scales?

for instance it says "relative major of e" so how do I find the key signature and starting note?

thanks for everything!
#2
its the major/minor scales that share the same accidental notes

eg: C major has got the same notes as A minor


basically just look for a major 6th on the root of a major and you'll have the relative minor
a minor 3rd on the root of a minor key and you'll get up to it's relative major
#3
Yes, so for example to find the relative major of E minor you would go a minor third up from E, which gives you G major.
#5
So for the parallel minor of Bb minor I would use Bb as the key signature? thanks for all the contributions everyone!
#6
If you have a guitar, just find that root note of the minor key you want the relative major of and then go up three half steps or three frets, and you will get the relative major key of a minor key.
12 fret fury
Last edited by Punk Poser at Nov 7, 2008,
#7
Quote by andrew6986
So for the parallel minor of Bb minor I would use Bb as the key signature? thanks for all the contributions everyone!


no, you'd use Bb as the tonic. the key signature would be that of Bb Major which is 2 flats. if you wanted to know the relative major, they would have the same key signature.
#8
Quote by Punk Poser
If you have a guitar, just find that root note of the major key you want the relative of and then go up three half steps or three frets, and you will get the relative minor key of a major key.

Um, no, wrong way. To find the relative minor of a major key, count down 3 frets from the root of the major. For example, C major. Down 3 frets to the 6th of that major scale is A. So A minor has the same key signature as C major.

Reverse that to find the relative major of some minor key (i.e. go up 3 frets or 3 semi-tones).

Just to clear that up...

Grep.
#9
Oh man I am so confused now.


Could someone post something like this?

Parallel----(how to find) M to m and m to M


Relative minor--- (how to find) M to m and m to M
#10
Parallel:
M -> m - Go down to the 6th degree of the major scale. go down 3 semitones from C and you get the note A. A minor is the parallel minor of C major

m -> M - Go up a minor third from the tonic. A minor 3rd up from E is G, meaning the parallel major of E minor is G major


Relative:
Relative just means the same tonic note, but either major or minor. Relative minor of A major(3 sharps) is a minor(no sharps)
Same tonic note, but one is a major key and one is minor. Comprende?
#11
Quote by JakdOnCrack
Parallel:
M -> m - Go down to the 6th degree of the major scale. go down 3 semitones from C and you get the note A. A minor is the parallel minor of C major

m -> M - Go up a minor third from the tonic. A minor 3rd up from E is G, meaning the parallel major of E minor is G major


Relative:
Relative just means the same tonic note, but either major or minor. Relative minor of A major(3 sharps) is a minor(no sharps)
Same tonic note, but one is a major key and one is minor. Comprende?


Ok, let's get the real facts in here so people don't come out with wrong ideas. You got everything right but the relative/parallel thing.

Relative has the same key signature, but a different note as the tonic. Here's a wiki that explains it:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_key

Parallel means they have the same tonic but a different key signature:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_key

So C major's relative minor is A minor, none of them with sharps/flats (the A being 3 frets/semi-tones down from C). Parallel minor of C major would be C minor. But anyways, read and understand those wikis for more info.

Grep.
#13
^The same one. That is to say, you'd use the same key signature for a piece in C major as you would for a piece A minor, or you'd the same key signature for a piece in G major as you would for a piece in E minor, and so forth.
#15
Okay I have some sample problems, could you tell me the key signature and the tonic??

Parallel minor of D?


Relative major of F?


Parallel minor of E?


Relative minor of Eb?
#16
You already have ample information with which to answer those questions. Why don't you tell us, and we can let you know if you got it right? It's *your* homework.
#17
Quote by Arbitror
Yes, so for example to find the relative major of E minor you would go a minor third up from E, which gives you G major.
Or a 6th down, just throwing that out there
#19
Quote by andrew6986
Okay I have some sample problems, could you tell me the key signature and the tonic??

Parallel minor of D?


Relative major of F?


Parallel minor of E?


Relative minor of Eb?

The tonic is just the x in x minor/major.

To find the key signature of a parallel minor you first name the parallel minor, in the case of the first one D minor.

You then have to find the relative major of this key because relative minors and majors have the same key signature.

To do this you either find the third note of the minor scale of the key your in or count up 3 semitones from the tonic.

Either way in my previous example will give you F. This is the tonic of the major key, so it is F major. Then you just use the same key signature as the relatice major (assuming you know the key signatures).

To find the relative minor you either find the sixth note of the major scale or count three semitones down

So to give you a start, the first one's 2 flats in the key signature and the tonic is D. Try the other ones and post what you get here so we can check it.