#1
So I'm going to play from note now. What does the C in front of it all mean?
#9
As said already, a C where the time signature is means common time, or 4/4. A C with a line through it (like the cents symbol) means cut time, 2/2.
#10
Quote by Knurlheim
No he means common time signature, it means its in 4/4 time


Nitpicking: The C is a broken circle. It denote 4/4, but it does stand for "common time".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Arch, what would be "common time" then, and for that matter, "cut time" as well?


4/4 and 2/2.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#14
^He said it does stand for common time

Edit: v but not in that post
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Nov 7, 2008,
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
So then how does the "C" not stand for common time?


I denotes common time, it doesn't stand for it. The "C" is a broken circle, not a C. It is not shorthand for the term "common time".
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
Quote by Bangagong
It very clearly IS the letter C and it does stand for "Common time"
I don't know why people are calling it a circle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_signature


Did you even read that article before you linked to it?

A circle used as a time signature indicated tempus perfectum (a circle being a symbol of completeness), while an incomplete circle, resembling a letter C, indicated tempus imperfectum. Assuming the breve to be a beat, this corresponds to the modern concepts of triple meter and duple meter, respectively. In either case, a dot in the center indicated prolatio perfecta while the absence of such a dot indicated prolatio imperfecta, corresponding to simple meter and compound meter.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#21
Quote by gonzaw
So a C with a dot in it would denote 12/8?


A half circle with a dot in it denotes 6/8. I have never seen a C (broken circle) with a dot denoting 12/8.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#22
Quote by Archeo Avis
A half circle with a dot in it denotes 6/8. I have never seen a C (broken circle) with a dot denoting 12/8.


I thought the dot only alternated between simple and compound metres of the same "circle quality" (like if you have a broken circle, or 4/4, then a broken circle with a dot would be 4/4's compound metre, or 12/8, etc)

Why is it 6/8 then?
Because of the broken circle (C) with a slash inside of it?
#23
Quote by gonzaw
I thought the dot only alternated between simple and compound metres of the same "circle quality" (like if you have a broken circle, or 4/4, then a broken circle with a dot would be 4/4's compound metre, or 12/8, etc)

Why is it 6/8 then?
Because of the broken circle (C) with a slash inside of it?


I do not pretend to understand the rules, I merely enforce them.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#25
Quote by Archeo Avis
Did you even read that article before you linked to it?


Yes I did read the article before i posted it. The shorthand of it is that in the 16th century in Mensural notation a half circle meant "imperfect time" which was 2/4. So it did originate from a half circle and technically can still be referred to as imperfect time, but today it doesn't stand for 2/4 and it is not a half circle, it is the letter C.