#1
I've been wondering for a while what factors in one's set up creates a tight bass response in tone. Is it the type of fretboard or neck construction for the guitar? I know there are amps out their like the Randall V2 that create the effect because they have a switch that enables it. I've tried out USA made Jacksons with various amps that produced tight bass. Can you guys share with me what you know?
#2
Tight bass response really comes from the amp, cab and speakers.

The woods in a guitar can give the guitar brightness or darkness in tone, the pickups can have different voicing and emphasize different frequencies but if you're talking about a tight focused low end, that comes from the amp and cabinet.
#4
If the amp itself doesn't have a tight bass, it's not something you can just dial in. It really depends on the voicing of your amp, the specs of your cabinet and the speakers you're putting it through.

for example, my amp has a very pronounced low end (I use a JTM45 which is technically a bass amp) and the only I can keep it (somewhat) tight is to get speakers that can really handle a huge low end and I use a full 4x12 as well which keeps the low end focused. But even still, it is not anything a metal player could realistically use, even with that speaker and cab, there is just no real way to dial in a heavy low end on my amp without it getting boomy or flabby.

So yeah, it tightness in bass response really depends on the voicing of your amp and how the cabinet and speakers handle that voicing.
Last edited by al112987 at Nov 7, 2008,
#6
I find that speakers are a big factor. I recently switched from a B-52 AT 112 to an ENGL blackmore through 2x12 vintage 30 cabinet.

Not only are ENGLS very tight...those vintage 30s are rediculous. You couldn't make it boomy and flabby if you tried (and oh I tried....full bass, 2 ODs, drop C mahogany guitar)
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#7
Quote by Mark G
Not only are ENGLS very tight...those vintage 30s are rediculous. You couldn't make it boomy and flabby if you tried (and oh I tried....full bass, 2 ODs, drop C mahogany guitar)

That's more so the amp. An amp like a Recto can sound quite flabby through V30s and some of the Mesa cabs have a looser low-end, even using the same speakers (V30s) as their others.
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#8
In order of importance: Amp EQ, Speaker/Pickup, Cab. The pickup can have a huge effect on this, as a pickup plays a large role in the accent of "trivial" things like muting and harmonics.
#9
Quote by MatrixClaw
That's more so the amp. An amp like a Recto can sound quite flabby through V30s and some of the Mesa cabs have a looser low-end, even using the same speakers (V30s) as their others.



Maybe in tube rectifier mode, but I imagine switching to a solid state rectifier would tighten up the bass response considerably. Most metal players I've heard using the Mesa Rectifier lines don't have very flabby bass.
#10
also, not to go against anyone's opinion, the guitar can have a pretty decent effect on bass response.

i a/b'd my stock les paul special and my sg standard, and the les paul has much more bass response, while also being looser. i leave that up to the passive pickups and the mass of the body's wood (mahogany).

the sg has a much tighter bass response due to the pickups, and it has quite a bit less wood to the body (also mahogany).

i usually have my bass settings up a notch or two higher for the sg, but those settings make the les paul quite muddy.
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#11
Quote by al112987
Maybe in tube rectifier mode, but I imagine switching to a solid state rectifier would tighten up the bass response considerably. Most metal players I've heard using the Mesa Rectifier lines don't have very flabby bass.

Rectos are highly characterized as having a loose low-end. It can be tightened up, but most people don't know how to work the EQ right, an OD does wonders with them as well.

Quote by UnsignedRecords
also, not to go against anyone's opinion, the guitar can have a pretty decent effect on bass response.

This can be true as well though. However, I find it's not as big of a difference when you start getting into ~$1000 guitars (new). Usually the only reason you'd hear a huge difference in tightness of the amp from one guitar to another is because the quality of the wood and pickups in one is higher. All my guitars sound equally tight through my amps since I've upgraded
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#12
idk, I've played mesa dual rectifiers that had a pretty damn tight low end when using a solid state rectifier, I think it all depends on the rectifier mode selected, on tube rectifier settings, yeah, their bass is pretty loose, particularly compared to most amps but there are really few mass produced tube rectified amps.