Page 1 of 4
#1
So I'm reading "The Catcher in the Rye". I started it based purely on the fact that it is one of the most banned books, but then I got really into it. I think that anyone can relate to at least one thing in this book, and it gives you this weird outlook on life. Like if we really are "phonies" or not. What does the Pit say?
Quote by Ponyexpress
Grammar Nazis scare the living crap out of me mainly because I'm half Jewish


MY SONGS:
[thread="985311"]A Love/Hate Relationship[/thread]
[thread="985301"](All) I Can See[/thread]
[thread="983897"]My Heart is a Hand Grenade[/thread]
#3
All I know is that Mark David Chapman was holding the book when he killed John Lennon, and that dude was messed up.
Quote by RU Experienced?
Go see U2, then you can say you contributed money to Bono's giant Irish tower built out of the blood, tears, and the hopes of African children.
#6
I hated that book. It was lame
Quote by BlackandSilver
Kill 'em All in St Anger with the help of the Master of Puppets. He can Ride the Lightning, creating a Death Magnetic.



Myspace
#9
banning books? next thing you know they'll be burning them and killing ppl that know the answer to 1+1.
D;
#10
that is probably one of my favorite novels.
MyGear
Schecter Hellraiser (EMG 85/81 + 18v mod)
LTD SC-207 with EMG 707
Peavey 6505 Head
Some random Peavey 4x12 slant cab
Boss Chorus Ensemble + Boss DD-3 + Dunlop Crybaby Wah + Boss NS2
#12
One of my favorite books, great and makes you think, but if i knew someone like Holden, i would hit them straight in the jaw.
Quote by ZanasCross
I'm now so drunk that even if my mom had given me a blow job at aeg 2, i'd be like I'm a pmp, butches.!

If this even madkes sense... if yhou sig this, Iw ll kill you.
#14
Quote by minibrowny
Palin wants to ban it, therefore put it down or she will shoot you. For realz.



On a side note, I would love for a giant Elk to trample her to death. I would have sex with the animal that kills her. Just to show my gratitude.
#16
Quote by cliff_em_all
One of my favorite books, great and makes you think, but if i knew someone like Holden, i would hit them straight in the jaw.

you wouldn't hit a clinically insane person, would you?
Sent from my iPad.
#17
I love that novel

Only ignorant people ban books.
WILDCARD, BITCHES!!

Call me Patrick! My username sucks anyway
#18
I love that book.
*-)
Quote by Bob_Sacamano
i kinda wish we all had a penis and vagina instead of buttholes

i mean no offense to buttholes and poop or anything

Rest in Peace, Troy Davis and Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis and Eric Garner and Mike Brown
#19
that was one of the most ****ing horrible pieces of shit i've been forced to read in my life.
the minimalist σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ
#21
I wrote an essay on the book last year. I'm sure none of you would be interested in it anyway, but I'll post it.

“What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff—I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That’s all I’d do all day. I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all," (Salinger 172-173). This is what Holden Caulfield says as he confesses his fantasy to his little sister, Phoebe. Phoebe asked him what he’d like to be, and this is the only thing that Holden thought that he’d like to do (Salinger 172). At first glance, his desire to be the catcher in the rye seems completely insane and bizarre. However, Holden’s fantasy of being the catcher in the rye is a metaphor for his efforts to protect children from the corruption and superficiality of adulthood.
Holden’s desire to help children started when his brother, Allie, died. Allie died of Leukemia when Holden was thirteen. To Holden, Allie was a symbol of innocence and purity. In fact, "Life stopped for Holden on July 18, 1946, the day his brother died of leukemia," (Miller 129). This shows how important Allie was to Holden. Holden goes on to say “He was two years younger than I was, but about fifty times as intelligent," (Salinger 38). Although this may be a bit of an exaggeration, it, too, really shows how deeply Holden respected and cared for Allie. As a result of his brother’s death, he has a need to shelter children from growing up. After he died, Holden feared the change from childhood to adulthood. There is also evidence to prove that he may have stopped growing up and maturing from that point. Holden even says "I was sixteen then and I'm seventeen now, and sometimes I act like I'm about thirteen," (Salinger 9). This quote supports the fact that Holden has stopped mentally changing. Because of this, he doesn't want other people to grow up, ether. Indeed, he wants children to stay young and innocent. Throughout the book, Holden was stuck on the question “Why do things change?” as shown when he is in the museum and says “The best thing, though, in that museum is that everything always stayed right where it was. Nobody’d move," (Salinger 120). This is one example of Holden’s fear of change, and longing for everything to stay just like it is. This is part of the reason why he decided to become the catcher in the rye. Holden wants to protect children from changing and becoming older because he doesn’t want them to have to go through what he went through when his brother died.
One of the most important symbols in the book is Holden’s dream vocation of being the catcher in the rye. He says that he’d like nothing more than to “catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff—I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them,” (Salinger 173). He wants to protect them from falling. However, in this case, falling over the cliff is actually a metaphor for growing up, losing innocence, and eventually dying (Heiserman 129-137). French writes that Holden would "Keep the little kids who are running around the field without paying attention to where they are going from falling over the edge, thus allowing them forever to remain playing some carefree game," (40). So instead of allowing them to grow up, he would rather take care of them and protect them from not being carefree anymore. His reason behind this dream is that he wants to save other people from the emotional pain and stress that was put upon him after his brother died. This aspiration of helping kids is also shown by Sandock when he says "Holden wishes that Phoebe could remain safe in beautiful and innocent childhood; this feeling is allied to his grief for his brother Allie who died at ten, Phoebe's age," (Sandock). Another thing Holden does to protect the children is to erase “**** you,” from the walls. “Somebody’d written ‘**** you’ on the wall. It drove me damn near crazy. I thought how Phoebe and all the other little kids would see it and how they’d wonder what the hell it meant, and then finally some dirty kid would tell them—all cockeyed, naturally—and how they’d all think about it and maybe even worry about it for a couple of days. I kept wanting to kill whoever’d written it," (Salinger 201). This shows how passionate Holden is about protecting the innocence of the kids. In regards to this section, Richard Cartoni says "This desire is related to Holden's fear of becoming an adult, his disgust with the vulgarity of the "real" world, and his need to protect the innocence of those younger than him (like his little sister Phoebe),"(Cartoni). Holden is disgusted with the real world, and this is his way of protecting kids from its vulgarity. Later in the paragraph, he goes on to erase it when he says “I was afraid some teacher would catch me rubbing it off and would think I’d written it. But I rubbed it out anyway, finally," (Salinger 201). This quote can be interpreted as one small attempt at overcoming fears and growing up.
Towards the end of the text, Holden starts to realize that he cannot be the catcher in the rye after all. He realizes that he must let kids grow up, and that change is inevitable. The first sign of this is when Holden goes to Phoebe’s school to pick her up. After he erases the first “**** you” from the wall, he finds another one in a different hallway. He remarks “I tried to rub it off with my hand again, but it was scratched on, with a knife or something. It’s hopeless, anyway. If you had a million years to do it in, you couldn’t rub out even half the “**** you” signs in the world. It’s impossible," (Salinger 202). In this quote, Holden shows how disgusted he is with the vulgarity of the adult world. This is when Holden first starts to realize that he can’t protect everyone from growing up, and this discovery leads to "the most distressing epiphany of his quest, 'You can't ever find a place that's nice and peaceful because there isn't any,'(Salinger 264)," (French 42). This discovery is another sign of Holden beginning to accept the adult world as it is.
Holden finally breaks free from his desire to be the catcher on page 211 and 212 when he sees Phoebe on the carousel. Holden says “All the kids kept trying to grab for the gold ring, and so was old Phoebe, and I was sort of afraid she’d fall off the goddam horse, but I didn’t say anything or do anything. The thing with kids is, if they want to grab for the gold ring, you have to let them do it, and not say anything. If they fall off, they fall off, but it’s bad if you say anything to them," (Salinger 211-212). At this point, he realizes that kids have to make their own choices, and learn from them. Mr. Cartoni says "What Holden ultimately learns, however, is that one can neither escape nor protect others from vulgarity, disappearance, or erasure. Rather, they are simply facets of life that must be faced and endured by all at some point," (Cartoni). From this point on, Holden realizes that being the catcher in the rye is no longer a realistic goal. That’s what the last line means. If they make a bad choice, they make a bad choice, but you have to let them make it so they can learn from it. Once Holden realizes this, he becomes extremely happy. He says “I got pretty soaking wet, especially my neck and pants. My hunting hat really gave me quite a lot of protection, in a way, but I got soaked anyway. I didn’t care, though. I felt so damn happy all of a sudden, the way old Phoebe kept going around and around, I was damn near bawling, I felt so damn happy, if you want to know the truth," (Salinger 212-213). The way the meaning of the weather changed symbolizes the turning point of the story. This was the first time in the book that it was raining and he was happy. Up until that point, rain symbolized a bad mood for him. For example, when he was visiting Allie’s grave in the cemetery, it started to rain. “It wasn’t too bad when the sun was out, but twice—twice—we were there when it started to rain. It was awful. It rained on his lousy tombstone, and it rained on the grass on his stomach. It rained all over the place," (Salinger 155). We saw that before, Holden associated rain with death. However, now, that association is gone, and we can see our protagonist is essentially letting go of his previous feelings. After Holden let go of his desire to shelter children from the evil adult world, he was much happier.
Throughout the book, Holden has been a guardian of innocence, an enemy of the “phony”, but above all, just a lonely kid, afraid (or perhaps unable) to grow up. From the beginning of the book, he has adored children and found disgust for most adults. Also, from the beginning of the book, he has put forth an effort to protect the innocence of the children. In his own eyes, he is the catcher in the rye. However, by the end of the book, he has realized that all of his efforts to do so are in vain, and that there is nothing he can do to save children from the evil, corrupt adult world. Indeed, he has to let children make their own choices and grow up. By the end of the text, we can presume that our protagonist has taken a step into adulthood, himself, and, through his own journey into adulthood, he has learned to accept that.
#23
i didnt dig it... it didnt have a proper ending... unlike catch 22... the book with the best ending EVER!
Quote by Gibson_Rocker13
you are my new hero cause i do the exact same thing but i suck at it

#8 of the EHX USERS GUILD
Quote by SublimeGuitar
Orange Rocker 30. Best Marshall ever

epi firefly dsp 30, epi sg, big muff
olp five string, peavy max 158
#24
Quote by Turd_Ferguson
I wrote an essay on the book last year. I'm sure none of you would be interested in it anyway, but I'll post it.

*wall of text no one wants to read(



That isn't an essay, thats a few paragraphs worth.
#26
Quote by latinosuperstud
i didnt dig it... it didnt have a proper ending... unlike catch 22... the book with the best ending EVER!




I sat there with a blank stare wondering were the rest of the pages were.
#28
It bored me to tears.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
You should be careful what you say. Some asshole will probably sig it.

Quote by Axelfox
Yup, a girl went up to me in my fursuit one time.

Quote by Xiaoxi
I can fap to this. Keep going.
#29
Quote by Jackal58
It bored me to tears.



I you sure you weren't crying with Holden at the end when he was just SOOOO happy?
#31
Quote by Gibson06



I sat there with a blank stare wondering were the rest of the pages were.

was that an agree facepalm insulting the catcher? or a facepalm at my statement that catch 22 had a good ending? ... if the latter... well obvious you didnt understand yosarrian's (havent read it in a while, his names spelling slips me) mind...
Quote by Gibson_Rocker13
you are my new hero cause i do the exact same thing but i suck at it

#8 of the EHX USERS GUILD
Quote by SublimeGuitar
Orange Rocker 30. Best Marshall ever

epi firefly dsp 30, epi sg, big muff
olp five string, peavy max 158
#32
Quote by SeveralSpecies
I you sure you weren't crying with Holden at the end when he was just SOOOO happy?

By the time I got to that point I was ready to go out and shoot a celebrity.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
You should be careful what you say. Some asshole will probably sig it.

Quote by Axelfox
Yup, a girl went up to me in my fursuit one time.

Quote by Xiaoxi
I can fap to this. Keep going.
#33
I remember that book. My teacher had us read it three times in one year. I loved it at first, but after reading it twice I wanted to burn it. I mean, imagine writing not one, but THREE papers on the same book. That's nearly 15 pages for a book that wasn't even that great.

Don't get me wrong, if it wasn't required reading, I would have enjoyed it. I love how it's written from Holden's perspective while he's in a mental hospital. (Or something of the sort)
#34
Quote by Jackal58
By the time I got to that point I was ready to go out and shoot a celebrity.



If I had a gun, I would have shot myself after the table of contents.
#36
Quote by sargasm
I like it because Holden is a whiny little dork... like me!



Please. Would you pay for a hooker and than just wanna talk with her?


I swear he was gay.
#37
I read it 3 times in 3 days...I was in hospital, bored and one of the hot nurses liked it so I read it a lot to get her attention
#39
Quote by Thepoison92
I read it 3 times in 3 days...I was in hospital, bored and one of the hot nurses liked it so I read it a lot to get her attention



???


Taking your wang out would have gotten her attention better...
#40
Quote by SeveralSpecies
Please. Would you pay for a hooker and than just wanna talk with her?


I swear he was gay.


That's one possible interpretation, sure.
Page 1 of 4