#1
I've recently purchased a traynor ycs50 and the overdrive channels see a bit harsh/trebly when I turn up the gain and boost. What would be the best way to fix this.

I'm thinking:

New PU's - a new bridge and neck PU

New tubes - get new tubes to help change the sound

OD pedal - get something like a Bad Monkey to add gain and tighten the sound, maybe even make it creamier?

EQ pedal - get a MXR 10 or 6 band eq, maybe it will make the treble less harsh?

Distortion pedal - I really don't want to get one, kind of a last resort

Please list any suggestions you may have, Thanks.

EDIT: It only sounds harsh when I do chording with high gain. It's also pretty fizzy so I'm putting an ISP Decimator as another option
Gear:
Fender Highway One HSS Strat
Art & Lutherie Cedar Acoustic
Line6 UX2
No amp ... Help me find an amp
Last edited by mrxtreme_4 at Nov 7, 2008,
#2
Put it up against a wall or in a corner where two walls meet, and turn up the bass?
Quote by sargasm
There are no genres in metal that end with "core."
#3
If you want an extremely cheap fix, you could try rolling back on your tone knob. That's what I do when no other option is available.

Doesn't get the best results, but you don't pay anything.
#4
had this problem endlessly through different amps...then tried a properly broken in speaker and it all changed.
#5
Quote by Caparisoner
had this problem endlessly through different amps...then tried a properly broken in speaker and it all changed.


I've thought of this too, any links on how to properly break in a speaker? Or is it as simple as playing it for a couple days?
Gear:
Fender Highway One HSS Strat
Art & Lutherie Cedar Acoustic
Line6 UX2
No amp ... Help me find an amp
#6
Quote by mrxtreme_4
I've thought of this too, any links on how to properly break in a speaker? Or is it as simple as playing it for a couple days?



well i cant answer it definitively because the cab i was using was 10 years old and well used. when i used an identical cab that ive had for 18 years it was smooth. I actually played bass a lot through the speaker which i wouldnt reccommend but obviously did the trick!
#7
Quote by mrxtreme_4
I've thought of this too, any links on how to properly break in a speaker? Or is it as simple as playing it for a couple days?


I read from guitar world that to properly break in speakers, all you have to do is play the amp. They said that it should take about 50 hours at reasonable volumes.
#9
Alright so I've found some info on breaking in the speaker, but I fear the amp will still be a bit fizzy and noisy. What would be my best bet to fix this: An ISP decimator, an MXR 10 band EQ, or a Digitech bad monkey. I don't know if the EQ or the OD will do much for noise but I figured maybe they can tighten up the sound to get rid of the fizzyness or even make the amp more "creamier" or will these problems be solved by breaking in the speaker.
Gear:
Fender Highway One HSS Strat
Art & Lutherie Cedar Acoustic
Line6 UX2
No amp ... Help me find an amp
#11
Quote by stradivari310
Break in the speaker, and come back.



Agreed, harsh treble is the hallmark of an unbroken in speaker.
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