#1
So I'm trying to record an acoustic demo and sending it to local record companies. Anyone have some do's or don'ts? Thanks
Currently in blues mode.
#2
Just do what needs done doing.
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
Last edited by allislost at Nov 8, 2008,
#3
not to be an a$$ but simply put.... "DON'T". record companies get tons of unsolicited music daily and from what i understand it all ends up going directly into the trashcan. if you're sending it to a much smaller indie label it might be worth it. beyond that i recommend spending your time recording a demo and getting some exposure and a fan base. that will attract record execs quicker than sending them demo's. or so i've heard.
#4
Quote by z4twenny
not to be an a$$ but simply put.... "DON'T". record companies get tons of unsolicited music daily and from what i understand it all ends up going directly into the trashcan. if you're sending it to a much smaller indie label it might be worth it. beyond that i recommend spending your time recording a demo and getting some exposure and a fan base. that will attract record execs quicker than sending them demo's. or so i've heard.


This.

Just sending won't help. You need more then a good song. The songs out there today are not high standards. They wanna see/know more. They wanna see how u look, ur charisma, ur ability to cope with deadlines, Coping with interviews, reliability etc.

Your better of doing shows or get recognistion tru an indie label. Essentially get into release parties to get social with record producers.

They see u as a business partner/money income first and artist 2nd.

If i give a rough percentage: it's 50% music skill 50% business skill.

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#5
So the trick is to contact the labels, either directly, or better, through some sort of representation on your behalf - a manager, agent, entertainment lawyer, etc.

This has a couple of advantages.

First, if your material is really good, as in good enough to attract a major label, it will be good enough to get an agent/manager/entertainment lawyer with the right connections to act on your behalf.

Second, these people (you know... the credible ones with a reputations and a contact list to the right people) can put in a good word for you. It's one thing if your mom sends along a note with your demo that says you're awesome. It's a whole other bag of tricks if it is sent by a big-wig entertainment lawyer like Sanderson/Taylor, or a big-wig manager like Bruce Allen. (Canadian industry folks, but every country has their own). When THEY send it with a good word, the big execs will drop everything, put aside the big stack of CDs that actually made it to their desk, and give your material a listen.

Worst-case is that, if those people believe in you but can't get you signed just yet, they can at least hook you up with the top end of the business and put you on very visible tours and in very visible venues and hooked up with very visible promoters. They'll help you screen the interested indie labels and act on your behalf and help you get a good deal with them.

If your material is not up to the standards that representation is looking for, then you would be wasting your time sending it to Universal/Sony/Warner/Whatever label anyway.

That all said... contact the label and find out what they're looking for. You wouldn't send your metal album to Def Jam for instance. They don't do that. Find out their expectations for what they are looking for in a demo. Depending on the genre, a ghetto-blaster recording of you playing acoustic guitar and singing will be enough. These are the genres that are simply looking for great songs for other artists - typically along the lines of MOR or AC classifications. Other genres are very much about the presentation and production. You have to look great and sound great, along with having a stellar track record for making money on your own. Top-40 pop, most rock genres, and urban/hip-hop listings are like this.

Ultimately, though, it depends on what the label is looking for. You can either ask them directly, or get your representative to find out. (they'll probably already know anyways, though, because they will already know the folks at the label personally.... weekend gatherings, golf games, day-to-day business dealings, etc..... kinda the same way your parents know the people they work with too....)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Thanks a bunch guys like i've found a few small lables accepting all genres in my home town so i hope it goes well
Currently in blues mode.