#1
I just got the offer to buy one of these in acceptable condition for $115. Has anyone else played one of the goth series Les Paul's and how do they compare to a regular Epiphone Les Paul Studio. Has anyone noticed much difference. I am looking to use it just when I play gigs at a few select venues where security is lax and I have already seen some damage to my Gibson Les Paul. Let me know what you think.
#2
There are occasional quality control issues with the Epi studio and goth, otherwise they are just as good as the Standard Epis. Swap the pups and you have a damn nice guitar for stage use.
#3
Quote by mindstealer
I just got the offer to buy one of these in acceptable condition for $115. Has anyone else played one of the goth series Les Paul's and how do they compare to a regular Epiphone Les Paul Studio. Has anyone noticed much difference. I am looking to use it just when I play gigs at a few select venues where security is lax and I have already seen some damage to my Gibson Les Paul. Let me know what you think.
Very nice price! If you like the feel, get it. Also, the PUs can be updated if you're not too crazy about the tone, assuming you have a decent amp.

#4
Yeah I already have a pair of Seymour Duncan Alnico Pro II's that I was going to throw in. I never use stock pickups. I bought them for my other LP, but ended up throwing Gibson Burstbuckers in instead. I have a pretty good amp to run through. I mainly use my Marshall JCM800 when I am playing out. I am more concerned about the quality of tuners, bridge, etc. Any opinions.
#5
The hardware is not exactly great (the saddles have a lot of play and other minor issues). It's not too bad though, so usually you should be fine. The tuners look cheap, but they get the job done. Just keep the nut lubricated (use oil, graphit, etc.) and the guitar will stay in tune.
#7
The Goth I played was outclassed by other guitars in it's price range (namely Washburns) but for $115 I'd snatch that up in a second. IMO it's looks are worth that much alone.